Item #5000924 A Voyage Round the World. Containing an Account of Captain Dampier's Expedition into the South-Seas in the ship St. George, in the years 1703 and 1704… Together with the author's voyage from Amapalla on the west-coast of Mexico, to East India. William FUNNELL.

A Voyage Round the World…
A Voyage Round the World. Containing an Account of Captain Dampier's Expedition into the South-Seas in the ship St. George, in the years 1703 and 1704… Together with the author's voyage from Amapalla on the west-coast of Mexico, to East India.

London: Printed by W. Botham for James Knapton, 1707.

Octavo, with five folding maps and ten engraved plates; old half calf, spine panelled between raised bands, double labels, marbled sides and endpapers.

Dampier's mate rushes into print

First edition of Funnell's voyage narrative, an essential component of the Dampier voyage canon, later incorporated into Dampier's collected voyages. At the time of publication, however, it incensed Dampier so much that he published his single-sheet refutation, A Vindication.

First edition of Funnell's voyage narrative, an essential component of the Dampier voyage canon, later incorporated into Dampier's collected voyages. At the time of publication, however, it incensed Dampier so much that he published his single-sheet refutation, A Vindication.

Funnell joined Dampier's third privateering expedition as mate of the St. George which sailed for the Canary Islands, Brazil and the South Seas in April 1703. It was during this voyage that Alexander Selkirk, the prototype of Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, was marooned on Juan Fernandez. The St. George was joined by the Cinque Ports and both ships started looting on the South American coast in January 1704. Funnell's account is highly critical of Dampier, and charges him with being routinely drunk, using foul and abusive language, oppressing his crew, and cowardice. The antagonism between the two men was exacerbated when they took the Spanish galleon Asuncion as a prize. With limited time available, Dampier ordered the food stores moved to the St. George and forbade Funnell to search the Asuncion for hidden gold. Ultimately both the St. George and Cinque Ports were declared unseaworthy and abandoned in late 1704. The expedition split, with Funnell and other disgruntled sailors taking a small Spanish prize to Amboina in the Dutch East Indies, where the ship was impounded by the Dutch. Funnell, together with the remaining crew, was embarked on the next Dutch fleet for Europe. Dampier returned to Peru and thence the Indies where he was also temporarily imprisoned by the Dutch.

As a result, Funnell completed the circumnavigation (albeit by relay), and returned to England well before his captain. Dampier's own publisher Knapton rushed Funnell's narrative quickly into print. Burney criticises the mercenary motives of Knapton in publishing what was essentially 'A fourth volume… which contains not a word of Dampier's writing; but much that he disapproved'. Whilst Dampier's temper has long been questioned, surely Burney's summation of this publication is apt: it 'could not have fallen into worse hands than those of Funnell. Besides being extremely ignorant, he was void of regard or respect for veracity'.

Provenance: From the library of the late Dr. Robert Edwards AO.

Borba de Moraes, I:333-4; Davidson, 'A Book Collector's Notes', p. 33; Hill, 664; Sabin, 26213.

Condition Report: Two maps repaired

Price (AUD): $5,750.00

US$3,821.13   Other currencies

Ref: #5000924

Condition Report