Item #5000721 Genera plantarum eorumque characteres naturales secundum numerum, figuram, situm, et proportionem omnium fructificationis partium. eidtion novissima. Carl LINNAEUS, Carl von Linné.
Genera plantarum eorumque characteres naturales secundum numerum, figuram, situm, et proportionem omnium fructificationis partium. eidtion novissima.
Genera plantarum eorumque characteres naturales secundum numerum, figuram, situm, et proportionem omnium fructificationis partium. eidtion novissima.

Genera Plantarum…
Genera plantarum eorumque characteres naturales secundum numerum, figuram, situm, et proportionem omnium fructificationis partium. eidtion novissima.

Vienna: Joan. Thomae nob. de Trattnern, 1767.

Small octavo, a nice copy in contemporary marbled calf, spine gilt in compartments with red leather label.

Latest edition in 1767 of Linnaeus's botanical taxonomy

Linnaeus's definitive work on botanical taxonomy, which first appeared in Leiden in 1737. The Swedish naturalist (1707–1778) established the system of binomial nomenclature through the widespread acceptance of his list of plants in the 1753 edition of Species Plantarum, which is now taken as the starting point for all botanical nomenclature, whose standardisation is entirely owed to Linnaeus. As Stafleu points out, "the Genera plantarum was Linnaeus's most important book, even more than the Systema naturae, with respect to the practical introduction of his ideas... His reform was daring and thorough, based on an exceptional and practical knowledge of plants; although influenced by somewhat outmoded ideas, it had exactly the salutary effect which he wanted it to have: consistency and simplicity. These two were prime needs for taxonomy in 1737" (Stafleu). A series of editions followed the first publication, gradually revised as new information came to hand. This "latest edition" (editio novissima) was based on the sixth edition.

Linnaeus's definitive work on botanical taxonomy, which first appeared in Leiden in 1737. The Swedish naturalist (1707–1778) established the system of binomial nomenclature through the widespread acceptance of his list of plants in the 1753 edition of Species Plantarum, which is now taken as the starting point for all botanical nomenclature, whose standardisation is entirely owed to Linnaeus. As Stafleu points out, "the Genera plantarum was Linnaeus's most important book, even more than the Systema naturae, with respect to the practical introduction of his ideas... His reform was daring and thorough, based on an exceptional and practical knowledge of plants; although influenced by somewhat outmoded ideas, it had exactly the salutary effect which he wanted it to have: consistency and simplicity. These two were prime needs for taxonomy in 1737" (Stafleu). A series of editions followed the first publication, gradually revised as new information came to hand. This "latest edition" (editio novissima) was based on the sixth edition.

Soulsby, A catalogue of the works of Linnaeus, 315; Stafleu and Cowan, Taxonomic literature, 3844.

Condition Report: A little ageing to text but very good.

Price (AUD): $575.00

US$376.81   Other currencies

Ref: #5000721

Condition Report