Item #5000702 The Botany of the Antarctic Voyage of H.M. Discovery Ships Erebus and Terror in the years 1839-1843, under the Command of Captain James Clark Ross. Part Three. Flora Tasmaniae. (Volume one: Dicotyledons. Volume two: Monocotyledons and Acotyledones). Joseph Dalton HOOKER.
The Botany of the Antarctic Voyage of H.M. Discovery Ships Erebus and Terror in the years 1839-1843, under the Command of Captain James Clark Ross. Part Three. Flora Tasmaniae. (Volume one: Dicotyledons. Volume two: Monocotyledons and Acotyledones).
The Botany of the Antarctic Voyage of H.M. Discovery Ships Erebus and Terror in the years 1839-1843, under the Command of Captain James Clark Ross. Part Three. Flora Tasmaniae. (Volume one: Dicotyledons. Volume two: Monocotyledons and Acotyledones).
The Botany of the Antarctic Voyage of H.M. Discovery Ships Erebus and Terror in the years 1839-1843, under the Command of Captain James Clark Ross. Part Three. Flora Tasmaniae. (Volume one: Dicotyledons. Volume two: Monocotyledons and Acotyledones).
The Botany of the Antarctic Voyage of H.M. Discovery Ships Erebus and Terror in the years 1839-1843, under the Command of Captain James Clark Ross. Part Three. Flora Tasmaniae. (Volume one: Dicotyledons. Volume two: Monocotyledons and Acotyledones).

The Botany of the Antarctic Voyage… Part Three. Flora Tasmaniae…
The Botany of the Antarctic Voyage of H.M. Discovery Ships Erebus and Terror in the years 1839-1843, under the Command of Captain James Clark Ross. Part Three. Flora Tasmaniae. (Volume one: Dicotyledons. Volume two: Monocotyledons and Acotyledones).

London: Lovell Reeve, 1860.

Two volumes, large quarto, with 199 handcoloured lithograph plates (numbered 1-200, with the double-paged plate numbered 84-85) by Walter Hood Fitch and others; in a modern binding of polished calf, triple labels (numbered as part of a longer series of volumes).

The first published study to support Darwin's new theory

A fine copy of this rare and important book: the flora of Tasmania as examined by Hooker on Ross's 1840s expedition to the Antarctic.

A fine copy of this rare and important book: the flora of Tasmania as examined by Hooker on Ross's 1840s expedition to the Antarctic.

Joseph Dalton Hooker and his father William Jackson Hooker were the two most distinguished botanists of their day and held, in succession, the post of Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. As a young man J.D. Hooker sailed on Ross's Antarctic Expedition as assistant surgeon on HMS Erebus, and published his results in six lavishly produced volumes: Florae Novae-Zelandiae, Flora Antarctica and Flora Tasmaniae. The various parts of the Flora Tasmaniae were prepared between 1853 and 1859, and the completed two-volume work published in 1860.

Hooker dedicated it to the local naturalists Ronald Campbell Gunn and William Archer, noting that "This Flora of Tasmania… owes so much to their indefatigable exertions". It made use of plants collected by the local naturalist Robert Lawrence as well as Gunn and Archer.

Hooker's Flora Tasmaniae has a special significance in the history of the development of the theory of evolution, as the first published study to support Darwin's theory of natural selection, though Hooker prevaricated on his position: 'Hooker gradually changed his mind on evolution as he wrote up his findings from the Ross expedition. While he asserted that "my own views on the subjects of the variability of existing species" remain "unaltered from those which I maintained in the 'Flora of New Zealand'", the Flora Tasmaniae is written from a Darwinian perspective that effectively assumes natural selection, or as Hooker named it, the "variation" theory, to be correct' (Endersby, Jim. "What Made Darwinism Useful to Joseph Dalton Hooker?", online resource).

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Ferguson, 3840; Great Flower Books, p.60; Nissen BBI, 908; Rosove, 172-3.A1; Spence, 605; Staton & Tremaine, 2654.

Condition Report: A little spotting, mainly confined to the plain paper guard leaves; stamp scratched from lower panel of each spine.

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