Primera [-tercera] parte de los viente I un libros rituales I Monarchia Indiana, con el origen y guerras, de los Indios Ocidentales de sus poblaciones, descubrimiento, conquista, conversion y otras cosas maravillosas de la mesma tierra distribuydos en tres tomos…. Juan de TORQUEMADA.
Primera [-tercera] parte de los viente I un libros rituales I Monarchia Indiana, con el origen y guerras, de los Indios Ocidentales de sus poblaciones, descubrimiento, conquista, conversion y otras cosas maravillosas de la mesma tierra distribuydos en tres tomos…

Monarchia Indiana, con el origen y guerras, de los Indios Ocidentales…
Primera [-tercera] parte de los viente I un libros rituales I Monarchia Indiana, con el origen y guerras, de los Indios Ocidentales de sus poblaciones, descubrimiento, conquista, conversion y otras cosas maravillosas de la mesma tierra distribuydos en tres tomos…

Madrid: Nicolas Rodriguez Franco, 1723.

Three volumes, folio, with engraved titles and a folding map; contemporary limp vellum, spines titled by hand.

The most reliable source for Quiros's 1605 voyage, with a remarkable map of the Pacific

The "key work on the early history of Spanish North America, particularly Mexico, the Southwest and California" (Hill); this is the second and best edition including the famous map emphasising the full extent of the Pacific ocean, which depicts the Chinese coast, Philippines, Solomons, New Guinea and "Tierra Austral" to the west and Mexico and South America to the east. The preface mentions the extreme rarity of the 1615 Seville first edition - only three copies were known in Madrid in 1723 - and explains that most copies had apparently been lost in a shipwreck, presumably en-route to Mexico. The map had not been included in that 1615 edition.

The "key work on the early history of Spanish North America, particularly Mexico, the Southwest and California" (Hill); this is the second and best edition including the famous map emphasising the full extent of the Pacific ocean, which depicts the Chinese coast, Philippines, Solomons, New Guinea and "Tierra Austral" to the west and Mexico and South America to the east. The preface mentions the extreme rarity of the 1615 Seville first edition - only three copies were known in Madrid in 1723 - and explains that most copies had apparently been lost in a shipwreck, presumably en-route to Mexico. The map had not been included in that 1615 edition.

The book is especially important in the literature of Pacific exploration because of Torquemada's account of Quiros's voyage of 1605, in which he sailed from Callao to locate the fabled Southern Continent. The earliest extensive description of the expedition to be printed, this remained the only reliable source available to navigators, geographers and historians until the nineteenth century. Celsus Kelly ("The narrative of Pedro Fernandez de Quirós" in Historical Studies, Australia and New Zealand IX/34, May 1960) has shown that Torquemada had access to Quiros's own account of the voyage as well as to the journal of Munilla, the commissary of the Franciscans who was also on the voyage. In fact Torquemada probably met Quiros in Mexico City in 1607, and again in Madrid in 1613. Kelly shows too that Torquemada probably also interviewed two other members of the expedition, the ensign Pedro López de Sojo and the sergeant Pedro García de Lumbreras.

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Torquemada's book is important for many other reasons, not least for its account of Legazpi's expedition to the Philippines (see Retana, 226). Hill describes the book as the "key work on the early history of Spanish North America, particularly Mexico, the Southwest and California… the primary source of Vizcaíno's 1596 and 1602 expeditions and voyage of discovery to California. It contains Father Antonio de la Ascensión's letter which relates to Vizcaíno's voyage during which most of the bays, headlands and rivers, including San Diego, were renamed. Torquemada also deals at length with Juan de Oñate's conquest of New Mexico, and briefly with the expeditions of Coronado, Alarcón, Espizo and Niza… The Mexican historian and statesman Lucas Alamán called Torquemada the Livy of New Spain…" (Hill). The section of Torquemada's book dealing with the Vizcaíno expedition was published as a separate volume by the Book Club of California in 1933.

In Spanish Voyages to the Northwest Coast Henry Wagner makes numerous references to Torquemada's book in connection with Vizcaíno, Legaspi, Father Antonio and others. Furthermore, Wagner also nominates the folding map titled 'Descripcion de las Yndias Occidentales' as a significant early depiction of the western coast of North America. It is closely based on the 1601 map of Antonio de Herrera, so much so that 'at first sight, the plate of the Herrera map would seem to have been used, but a closer inspection proves the map has been re-engraved'. The map names two locations along the Northwest Coast, 'C. de Fortun' and 'Ya de Cedros' respectively, and depicts California as a large peninsula: 'it seems to have served as sufficient notice of the world of Spanish discoveries on the Northwest Coast. It was even sufficient in the eyes of the Spanish authorities, for in 1723 it was reproduced in Torquemada's Monarchia Indiana, and no better map was published in Spain until the latter part of the eighteenth century' (Cartography of the Northwest Coast p.148, catalogue 525).

Provenance: Private collection (Sydney).

Hill, 1707; JCB, 339; Medina, BHA IV, 2491; Palau, 335033.

Condition Report: Vellum covers a little wrinkled and soiled, patina consistent with age; traces of original ties not present.

Price (AUD): $24,500.00

US$18,405.50   Other currencies

Ref: #5000416

Condition Report