Item #5000328 A Cruising Voyage round the World: First to the South-Sea, thence to the East-Indies, and homewards by the Cape of Good-Hope. Begun in 1708 and finish'd in 1711. Containing a Journal of all the remarkable transactions; particularity of the taking of Puna and Guiaquil, of the Acapulca Ship, and other Prizes: An account of Alexander Selkirk's living alone for Years and four Months in an island; and a brief description of several Countries in our Course noted for trade, especially in the South-Sea. With maps of all the Coast, from the best Spanish Manuscript Draughts. And an Introduction relating to the South-Sea Trade. Captain Woodes ROGERS.

A Cruising Voyage round the World…
A Cruising Voyage round the World: First to the South-Sea, thence to the East-Indies, and homewards by the Cape of Good-Hope. Begun in 1708 and finish'd in 1711. Containing a Journal of all the remarkable transactions; particularity of the taking of Puna and Guiaquil, of the Acapulca Ship, and other Prizes: An account of Alexander Selkirk's living alone for Years and four Months in an island; and a brief description of several Countries in our Course noted for trade, especially in the South-Sea. With maps of all the Coast, from the best Spanish Manuscript Draughts. And an Introduction relating to the South-Sea Trade.

London: Andrew Bell… and Bernard Lintot, 1718.

Octavo, with a folding world map as frontispiece and four others covering the Pacific coast from Mexico to Chile; contemporary panelled calf, rebacked.

Capturing the Manila galleon, and rescuing Robinson Crusoe

Second edition of this classic account of the privateering voyage planned by Rogers on the proposal of William Dampier, who served as pilot. The three-year expedition crossed the Pacific to Asia, captured several vessels including the Manila galleon at Puerto Seguro, and brought back the marooned Alexander Selkirk from Juan Fernández Island. It was this famous rescue, of course, that provided Rogers's friend Daniel Defoe with the plot for Robinson Crusoe. One of the more successful such voyages, Rogers returned as a national hero and almost everyone came home safely, though Rogers's own brother had been killed in a skirmish. It was reported that the original investors in the venture doubled their money, though the crew joined to sue Rogers claiming their fair share of the profits. Rogers was forced into bankruptcy.

Second edition of this classic account of the privateering voyage planned by Rogers on the proposal of William Dampier, who served as pilot. The three-year expedition crossed the Pacific to Asia, captured several vessels including the Manila galleon at Puerto Seguro, and brought back the marooned Alexander Selkirk from Juan Fernández Island. It was this famous rescue, of course, that provided Rogers's friend Daniel Defoe with the plot for Robinson Crusoe. One of the more successful such voyages, Rogers returned as a national hero and almost everyone came home safely, though Rogers's own brother had been killed in a skirmish. It was reported that the original investors in the venture doubled their money, though the crew joined to sue Rogers claiming their fair share of the profits. Rogers was forced into bankruptcy.

The public was fascinated by the story and his description of the adventurous voyage sold well, going through four editions; it also appears in the 1729 collected edition of Dampier's voyages. The early editions are all scarce. This is the true second edition, though a later printing in 1726 falsely claimed to be the second. Pp. 279-312 contain an important early description of California.

Provenance: Frederick E. Ellis (American collector, with bookplate and ownership signature).

Borba de Moraes, p. 744; Cowan, p. 540; Hill, 1479-80 (different editions); NMM, Piracy & Privateering, 472; Sabin, 72754.

Condition Report: Old spine replacement wearing, but otherwise a very good copy.

Price (AUD): $5,500.00

US$3,545.68   Other currencies

Ref: #5000328

Condition Report