Item #5000257 Manuscript archive, richly illustrated, relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art, including important items from New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania. Maximilien-René RADIGUET, "Max"
Manuscript archive, richly illustrated, relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art, including important items from New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Manuscript archive, richly illustrated, relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art, including important items from New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Manuscript archive, richly illustrated, relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art, including important items from New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Manuscript archive, richly illustrated, relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art, including important items from New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Manuscript archive, richly illustrated, relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art, including important items from New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Manuscript archive, richly illustrated, relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art, including important items from New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.

Manuscript archive relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art…
Manuscript archive, richly illustrated, relating to a major Pacific collection of ethnographic art, including important items from New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.

France, probably Paris: N.D., circa 1850.

A small archive of manuscripts comprising: (1) a detailed illustrated South Seas catalogue on six large wove paper bifolia, 292 x 384 mm., in pencil, folded in half; (2) a similarly-sized illustrated but less-annotated South American catalogue on eight large wove paper bifolia, 301 x 404 mm., in pencil, folded in half; (3) a simple catalogue handlist on seven large sheets of wove paper, 360 x 230 mm., completed in ink with some pencil corrections, the sheets folded in half on the vertical axis; (4) a numbered catalogue of South Seas artefacts on two bifolia 312 x 400 mm., central fold; (5) some working papers, including one sheet numbered in pencil, 304 x 210 mm.; a 5-pp. handlist in pencil on two bifolia, 285 x 197 mm.; and a 2-pp. list in pencil, 315 x 205 mm., almost entirely struck through.

The South Seas collection of a major voyage artist and writer

An exceptional and valuable archive of manuscripts relating to one of the most historically significant Pacific, American and Australian ethnographic collections, including countless fine illustrations which are destined to provide a baseline for research into this treasure trove of southern hemisphere art.

An exceptional and valuable archive of manuscripts relating to one of the most historically significant Pacific, American and Australian ethnographic collections, including countless fine illustrations which are destined to provide a baseline for research into this treasure trove of southern hemisphere art.

The manuscripts are the work of Maximilien-René "Max" Radiguet (1816-1899), the private secretary of Admiral Dupetit-Thouars during the famous voyage of the Reine Blanche in 1842, and now considered one of the pioneers among French artists of the South Seas (Fayaud). A keen observer and ethnographer, his pictures have long been recognised as among the most significant visual records of the Pacific, especially regarding the Marquesas and Tahiti. He was also, as becomes clear from this archive, a passionate enthusiast and probably collector too, an interest that he shared with many of the officers with whom he associated, and which in his case could have been inspired by Dupetit-Thouars himself, who is known to have collected widely, with items now known in Boulogne-sur-mer and the Quai Branly in Paris (Carreau).

Dating from around 1850, the archive includes two fully-annotated handlists, clearly the earliest attempt to bring a semblance of order to a very large ethnographic collection, and two fuller illustrated catalogues which rely on Radiguet's artistic skill to show the curated version of the collection in remarkable detail. What these papers show, it can now be proved, is the precious outlines of the beginnings of a major mid-nineteenth century voyage collection that became known as the Musée Ginoux in Nice.

Perhaps 150 of the items in the Ginoux collection as described here are now in the Musée des Explorations du Monde in Cannes: not only will these newly discovered manuscripts therefore provide an insight into this major repository of early Pacific history and art, but they may also provide a key to unlock the history of hundreds more artefacts of the greatest significance, including a core group from early Australia.

No fewer than 18 significant Australian items each receive an unusually full description, with several, despite the relatively early date, deriving from Victoria. The fullest description relates to two boomerangs -- Radiguet was clearly very interested in such an "arme extraordinaire de la Nouvelle Hollande" (nos. 118 & 119) – but he was also intrigued by what was evidently a woomera (he calls it a "raquette") and the spear which it propelled (nos. 108 & 109). Among the various shields, axes and necklaces there is also the very surprising inclusion of a bark canoe from Tasmania.

Ginoux and his collection

Radiguet seems to have become the de facto curator of this collection associated with a major figure in French Polynesia, his friend Edmond de Ginoux de la Coche (1811-1870) and, through him, the voyage artist Adèle de Dombasle (1819-1901). Although Frédéric de la Grandville, who wrote the essential work on Ginoux (Edmond de Ginoux, ethnologue en Polynésie française dans les années 1840, 2001), did not discover how the two met, Radiguet's connection with Ginoux may have dated from their meeting in either the Marquesas or Tahiti, or from when they were moving in similar government and South Seas circles in Paris later in the 1840s.

Ginoux's subsequently created museum is thought to have ultimately included some 500 items, notably two with a known provenance which are specifically mentioned in Radiguet's manuscripts: a necklace presented to Ginoux's travelling companion Dombasle by a High Priestess in Nuku Hiva and a decorated coconut shell which had been the personal gift of Queen Pomaré in Tahiti. Indeed, while it would be beyond the scale of this note to completely identify the ways in which the various early lists relate precisely to a manuscript catalogue prepared by Ginoux in the 1860s (see Grandville), there is constant mention of similar items throughout: the skull of a Marquesan man taken in combat; an 'Akaoutua,' a club decorated with the beard of an old man; a curious and extremely rare Marquesan taboo object in the form of a T; and so on.

However, it is the connection between Radiguet's larger illustrated catalogues and Ginoux's later papers which is definitive. Sometime around 1866 Ginoux wrote a manuscript catalogue of his collection which got as far as item no. 337 before it stopped abruptly, presumably because of the massive stroke he suffered in that year (Grandville, p. 29). The illustrated manuscripts by Radiguet match this catalogue exactly. The Australian items, for example, are numbered in the precise order in both (see Grandville, pp. 119, 124-127, 239-240, 315-316). Indeed, it is interesting to note that the tone of Radiguet's manuscript is slightly more thoughtful than Ginoux's later commentary. At one point, for example, Radiguet ridicules the supposed "stupidity" of the Australian Aborigines, when they are capable of making such fascinating weapons as the boomerang and the woomera; in Ginoux's later catalogue, this is far more equivocal ("malgré leur stupidité native").

Importantly, this also means that any of the identified items numbered beyond 337 can only be identified through whatever appears in this archive, notably including no. 344, the Tasmanian bark canoe and perhaps 40 or more other pieces. The South American catalogue, for that matter, is not otherwise recorded, and nor are the items from classical antiquity that are scattered throughout all of the papers. There are almost endless opportunities for further research here.

Recent work in Cannes has noted that the history of the Ginoux collection remains shaded in mystery due to the complexity of its provenance and the dearth of accurate or detailed contemporary records. It is to be hoped that the rediscovery of the present manuscripts will not only shed light on the connections that existed between the important Pacific writer Radiguet and the collectors Ginoux de la Coche and Dombasle, but also provide an important insight into the work of unravelling the history and fate of many of these important Australian and Pacific artefacts.

The Collection

The archive is divided into five parts, beginning with what is in essentials, a South Seas catalogue (1). The illustrations are small but detailed, and give the most remarkable impression of the breadth of the collection, showing everything from arms to musical instruments, quite apart from cooking utensils, wooden sculptures, shell decorations and ship models.

The fullest and most detailed of the lists, organised chiefly by type of implement rather than region, the catalogue is fully illustrated, and includes the fullest of any of Radiguet's notes, on many occasions radically expanding from the simpler records of the two handlists described below.

It includes no fewer than 18 separate Australian items, each given an unusually full description and including several, despite the relatively early date, from Victoria. The fullest description relates to two boomerangs -- Radiguet was clearly very interested in such an "arme extraordinaire de la Nouvelle Hollande" (nos. 118 & 119) – but he was also intrigued by what was evidently a woomera (he calls it a "raquette") and the spear which it propelled (nos. 108 & 109). Among the various shields, axes and necklaces there is also the very surprising inclusion of a bark canoe from Tasmania.

The collection is very obviously weighted towards the Marquesas and Tahiti, notably including a necklace made of whale teeth that was presented by a high priestess of the former islands, as well as some gifts from Queen Pomaré of Tahiti.

This is followed by (2) an illustrated museum catalogue depicting chiefly South American items, mostly without notes or annotation. The detail in many of the pictures, which often includes notes on the colour palette, is such that this may prove to be a key document in unravelling any number of mysteries. This section also further proves the connection to the formal museum, because it includes notes regarding where the various collections were housed (one is from a vitrine in the middle of the museum, for example, another from a vitrine on the wall).

These two major manuscripts are bolstered by what are obviously Radiguet's working papers, of such detail and so far-ranging, that they are perhaps the more historically important, as they may be the clue to unravelling the earliest history of the collection. One manuscript, chiefly in ink, is basically a handlist (3). Undated, it notably includes reference to classical antiquities not otherwise recorded, including a major statue of Venus in bronze, that was discovered in Cherchell, Algeria, during bridge-work in 1844; reference to other items collected on a 'campaign' to Athens; and a small selection from Egypt. This handlist, organised by region, not type, also includes the clearest delineation of the north American part of the collection, notably a large group from the United States and Canada (including items from the nation of the Mohicans (Madison, NJ); Iroquois; Chippewa; the "Indiens du Canada et les Esquimaux"; as well as a variety of geological samples) and two major pieces from the Pacific Northwest, one from the "Indiens de la Haute Californie." This list is additionally important because it does include descriptions of South American items which may be of help in cataloguing the museum drawings.

There is also a simple numbered South Seas handlist (4), with a different numbering system and with several of the items more fully described: the necklace given to Madame de Dombasle, for example, has the added note that she acquired it in September 1848. The list is as follows: Marquesas 1-158; Tahiti 159-195; Pomatou 196-210; Sandwich 231-233; Gambier 234-238; Hamoa 239-247; Tonga 248-259; Viti 260-283; New Zealand 284-292; Savage 293; Cook Islands 293-305; Mulgrave 306-308; New Holland 309-328.

Lastly there is a small group of working papers (5) which appear to be intermediate stages of the different catalogues, much of them legible but struck-through or scribbled-out.

Radiguet in the Pacific

Radiguet was born in Landerneau, Brittany. After an early posting to Haiti he was appointed secretary to Admiral Abel-Aubert du Dupetit-Thouars (1793-1864) on board the famous Reine Blanche. Dupetit-Thouars was a vastly experienced French naval officer who commanded his own circumnavigation and extensive survey voyage of the Pacific on board the Vénus between 1836 and 1839, making important calls at Sydney, Hobart, Hawaii, Tahiti and California, although it was his stay at the Marquesas which proved decisive for his career.

Back in France it was thought that this island chain would be an ideal French acquisition, Dupetit-Thouars himself arguing that it should be a combined naval base and penal colony (on the Botany Bay model, that is). Usually based, like his English counterparts, in Valparaiso, Dupetit-Thouars was therefore well-placed to execute his new orders for a 'mission spéciale' to annex the Marquesas as commander of the Reine Blanche in 1842 and to explore the scattered islands of the Pacific with explicit orders to promote French interests, not only through the establishment of French naval outposts, but by furthering their merchant interests and supporting the Catholic missionaries.

In his role as Dupetit-Thouars's secretary, Radiguet was therefore not only present at the French annexation of the Marquesas but was soon also an eyewitness to the dramatic and far-reaching events in Tahiti, part of the so-called Pritchard Affair – George Pritchard was a British missionary who had convinced Queen Pomaré IV to expel two Catholic missionaries, an action which so outraged Dupetit-Thouars, then on board the Vénus, to declare a French protectorate.

While they were annexing the Marquesas in 1842, news reached the French Admiral of the arrival in Tahiti of HMS Vindictive under the fire-breathing Captain Toup Nicholas, who had been ordered to not only take Pritchard back to the island but to arrive in some martial splendour by Governor Gipps in Sydney. No shrinking violet and fully aware that French ambitions were waxing, Dupetit-Thouars soon arrived in Tahiti, not only staring down the Vindictive and deporting Pritchard, but going so far as to send Pomaré into exile in the Windward group. The actions led to the Franco-Tahitian War (1844-1846).

Radiguet was deeply enmeshed in these dramatic events, making him well-placed to become the de facto chronicler of the whole experience and the great official historian of French ambitions, initially in a series of articles published in the Revue des Deux Mondes and later in his major history, Les Derniers Sauvages (first published 1860), called one of the foundation books of this period of Pacific history, especially regarding the Marquesas, by O'Reilly & Reitman (Bibliographie de Tahiti et de la Polynesésie française, no. 1048).

Although these essays and books are traditional voyage fare, it is very clear that Radiguet was not only a superb observer of the political machinations but also both the mores and the physical artefacts of the local culture. It also helped that he was attached to the Dépôt de la Marine from March 1845 to March 1848 (Fayaud), doubly so because he was revealed to be a wonderful artist, notably in an album of views which has since been recognised as one of the subtler and more important visual histories of the colonisation project of the French in this era. The album has since been recognised for its tremendous insight and accuracy – "of the greatest documentary value" (O'Reilly & Reitman) – chiefly because of all of his colleagues, Radiguet is one of the few to try and depict Polynesian life at mid-century not as some pre-contact fantasy but as complicated and nuanced: despite his interest in their traditional weapons, for example, the men of the Marquesas are just as likely to be depicted carrying the cruder but effective weapon of a French bayonet strapped to a hardwood pole.

Equally, much like his printed accounts, views such as his sketch of Taiohae in Nuku Hiva or some of his incredible ink and wash portraits of chiefs in full regalia amply prove that Radiguet was making detailed ethnographic portraits that relied, in part, on his precise figuring of the local artefacts (Lavondès & Jacquemin, pp. 23-33).

Radiguet and Ginoux

These must have been his calling cards when he was introduced to Edmond de Ginoux de la Coche. Ginoux had first arrived in the Marquesas in 1843 on board a ship commanded by Armand Bruat, the newly installed Governor. Ginoux had planned to travel more widely in the region, but ended up staying in Tahiti making a collection which focussed on the Marquesas and the Society Islands, but also acquiring items from sailors who anchored in Papeete from as far afield as Fiji, Samoa and Australia (Jaillet, p. 37). He returned to Paris in 1845, where he composed a major monograph on the Marquesas for the Ministry in July 1846, directly leading to his appointment, in July 1847, to report on the missions in Oceania and South America, his substantial income allowing him much better opportunities for his ethnographic studies. He was to be accompanied on this second Pacific voyage by the artist Adèle de Dombasle, the two arriving in Valparaiso in March 1848, being chased by the news of the February Revolution in France.

Dombasle did manage to take a series of major Marquesan views and sketches during her sadly truncated stay (the new Governor, Lavaud, had no time for Ginoux or Dombasle, rushing to send them both away). Ginoux, short of money, made a slow trip home, staying for many months in Lima, where he expanded his collection of Peruvian and Chilean artefacts, before visiting Panama, Jamaica, Cuba, New York and Lake Ontario, before returning to France in 1850.

In the 1850s and 1860s, despite failing health, Ginoux worked at this collection. He left Paris for the Côte d'Azur in 1857, setting up his so-called 'Musée Ginoux' in a villa in Nice. A contemporary visitor described how it was divided into two parts, one centred on the South Seas and the second on the Americas (Roux, p. 425), precisely as adumbrated in these manuscripts.

The collection was effectively bequeathed to Dombasle after his death in 1870, while she in turn is known to have offered it to the government in Paris, before selling it to the Baron Lycklama a Dutch archaeologist who installed it in his villa in Cannes in 1877: exactly how much changed hands is still disputed, and it is possible that she had sold parts even before his acquisition.

After the death of Lycklama in 1900 and his wife in 1914 the collection was effectively crated for decades, but what remains now forms part of the Musée des Explorations du Monde in Cannes.

References:

Bach, John. The Australia Station (1986)

Baldwin, J.R. 'England and the French Seizure of the Society Islands' (1938)

Brookes, Jean Ingram. International Rivalry in the Pacific Islands, 1800-1875 (1941)

Carreau, Lucie. 'Curiosity, revolution, science and art: Pacific collections and French museums' (2018)

Dening, Greg. Islands and Beaches: discourse on a silent land, Marquesas 1774-1880 (1980)

Dombasle, Adèle de. 'Promenade à Noukouhiva. Visite à la Grande Prêtresse (1851)

Fayaud, Viviane. 'Dessins au long cours: albums français dans le Pacifique Sud au XVIIIe et XIXe siècle' (2014)

Fayaud, Viviane. 'Images de guerre méconnues: le conflit franco-tahitien (1843-1847)' (2013)

Gough, Barry. Pax Britannica: Ruling the Waves and Keeping the Peace before Armageddon (2014)

Grandville, Frédéric de la. Edmond de Ginoux, ethnologue en Polynésie française dans les années 1840 (2001)

Howgego, Raymond. Encyclopedia of Exploration (vol. II)

Jaillet, Théano. 'Cannes, de Ginoux de la Coche à 2020' (2021)

Lavondès, Anne & Sylviane Jacquemin, 'Des premiers écrits aux collections d'objets' (1995)

Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac (online catalogue)

O'Reilly/Reitman, esp. nos. 1048 & 10162

Panoff, Michel (ed.). Trésors des îles Marquises (1995)

Roux, Joseph. Statistique des Alpes Maritimes… Seconde Partie (1862)

Sarout, Emilie Dotte. 'Pacific Matildas: Finding the Women in the History of Pacific Archaeology' (2021)

Sourieau, Marie-Agnès, 'Max Radiguet et les "derniers sauvages": la degradation de l'exotisme' (2001)

Van Santen, Caroline. 'Nuku Hiva 1825: ethnohistory of a Dutch-Marquesan encounter' (2021)

Catalogue in detail

(1) The South Seas catalogue, illustrated and fully annotated, in pencil.

The fullest and most detailed of the lists, organised chiefly by type of implement rather than region. Not only is this catalogue fully illustrated, but it includes the fullest of any of Radiguet's notes, on many occasions radically expanding from the simpler records of the two handlists (3 & 4). The numbering system does not correspond with either of those handlists.

It includes no fewer than 18 separate Australian items, each given an unusually full description.

SHEET 1 – arms, musical instruments, some ship models

"118 / 119. Boumerang, arme extraordinaire de la Nouvelle Hollande. Cette arme lancée avec force, d'une certaine manière, frappe violemment un but éloigné de [ ] 200 pds et par une réaction curieuse, elle revient avec force à celui qui l'a lancée, les sauvages la plus stupides vut imagine cette arme!"

160 / 161. Baton de chef, NZ. Long note.

SHEET 2 – chiefly arms, including items from Australia and California

"111 / 112. Bouclier du sauvages Australiens, Province de Victoria."

"113 / 114 / 115/ 116 / 117. Arme de la Nlle. Hollande, Province de Victoria."

SHEET 3 – arms, ceremonial items.

"108. Javelot de la Nouvelle Hollande, province Nlle. Galles du Sud."

"109. Raquette [suvant?] à lancer le juvelot ci-dessus, Nouvelles Hollande. Voir no. 110."

SHEET 4 – ceremonial items, models, utensils

'Shark Gods' from the prows of Marquesan canoes and a model of a Hawaiian outrigger.

"110. Couteau servant à affuter la javelot no. 108. De la Nouvelle Hollande. Voir aussi no 109."

"331 / 332. Haches de la Nouvelle Hollande. Pierres et poignée sont réunies au moyen d'une resine."

"333. Pierre à tailler le bois. Nouvelle Hollande."

"344. Modèle de pirogue en écorces d'arbre, de la terre du Van-Diemen, Tasmanie."

SHEET 5 – fishing, ceremonial, largely from the Marquesas, including a human skull

'Feather-bundles' from Pomotou, discovered in 1844.

'66. Tête de chef tué dans un combat, [portée?] en trophée à sa ceinture pour le vainqueur. Iles Marquises.'

'163 / 164 / 165. Couronne en faille d'igname, souvenir de la reine Pomaré, Tahiti.'

"256. Collier en petits tubes de bamboo, Nouvelle Hollande."

SHEET 6 -- chiefly ceremonial

"Sac ou poche ornée de plumes d'Emu et de [partir?] de bec d'ornithorynx. Nlle Hollande."

(2) The museum catalogue, chiefly South American and largely illustrations only, in pencil.

SHEET 1 – gourds etc. Noted as from Chile, Peru and Mexico.

SHEET 2 – more elaborate and decorated pots and vases.

SHEET 3 – pots and vases marked 'm', 'n' and 'r' and noted as from the vitrine in the middle of the museum.

SHEET 4 – pots, utensils, masks, noted from bottom of the vitrine on the wall. Annotated with letters that seem clearly to be colour-markers (jaune, rouge, noir, etc.).

SHEET 5 – a group of what seem to be displays including weapons, bracelets, clothes, from the vitrine in the middle of the museum.

SHEET 6 – a smaller number of elaborate pots and idols.

SHEET 7 – very detailed illustrations of figures and deities, South American.

SHEET 8 – a smaller number of pots from the top vitrine on the wall.

(3) The simple handlist in ink and pencil.

SHEET 1

Antiquities Grecques et Romaines.

"Vénus en bronze (romaine) trouvée en 1844 à Cherchel, Afrique, [ie Algeria] dans les travaux du pont; elle gisait à 4 mètres de profondeur dans une marne durcie."

https://archive.org/details/musedalger00doub/page/74/mode/2up

https://collections.louvre.fr/en/ark:/53355/cl010301481

Everything else is from the campaign to Athens.

Iles Marquises.

A remarkable collection, full of important items, some made of human hair, others incorporating human bones. Includes a food utensil in the shape of a bird but with a fantastic head; a 'Tapou' in the form of a 'T', given between chiefs and warriors as a symbol of alliance or truce. Also includes a "collier sacré fait d'une dent de cachalot" that was given to Madame de Dombasle in Nuku Hiva by the "grande [Prêtresse]".

Malaisie.

Three items.

SHEET 2

Algèrie, Turquiè, Syrie.

[0 items].

Etats-Unis et Canada.

Extensive list, with items from the nation of the Mohicans (Madison, NJ); Iroquois; Chippewa; the 'Indiens du Canada et les Esquimaux'; Esquimaux; as well as a variety of geological samples.

Californie et Côte N.O. d'Amérique.

Two items, from the Esquimaux and from the 'Indiens de la Haute Californie.'

Antiquités Egyptiennes.

Small list.

SHEET 3

Nouvelle Hollande.

3 line items in ink with an additional 9 in pencil. Some of the line items record multiple examples, for a total of 17 different items. Particularly notes a bark canoe from Tasmania; a necklace and several other items sourced in the 'Victoria colony'; 'arme de guerre de Sydney''; and a boomerang. The presence of items from Victoria is of significance, as is Radiguet's use of the actual name of the colony, which helps confirm a date in the early 1850s.

Ile Sauvage.

1 Lance with two points.

Archipel de Cook (Mangia).

Small list.

Iles Gambier.

4 items.

Iles Sandwich.

3 items, some tapa and a model of a canoe.

Iles Tonka-Tapou.

Model of a grand double-canoe; several pieces of jewellery and weapons.

Iles Samoa.

Models; casses-têtes; necklaces.

Iles Viti.

Quite a substantial list (21) in ink and pencil. A lot of casses-têtes.

Iles Pomotou.

A dozen items.

Nouvelle Zélande.

8 items in ink, one in pencil.

SHEET 4

Chine, Malaisie, Indes Orientales.

Long list, a few added in pencil.

Tahiti.

Substantial group. 'Couronnet de femme en pailles de Piha, ou Arow-rowt'; polished coconut shells the gift of Queen Pomaré; tapa; stones; some seeds.

Iles Mulgraves.

3 items.

Nouvelle-Calédonie.

[0 items – although lower down the 'Tête à deux [faces] (amulette)' could refer to this or to Tahiti].

SHEET 5

Sénégal.

4 items.

Brésil.

4 items.

Cayenne.

Several items including several grains and seeds.

Mexique.

1 item.

Cayenne.

3 items but crossed through.

Chili.

Minerals; calabashes; items from Valparaiso.

Pérou.

A good list, substantially amended. Extends (see staining of paper) on to sheet 6.

SHEET 6

A much expanded list, almost certainly a continuation of Peru.

Bolivie.

3 items.

Equateur.

About a dozen items in ink and pencil.

Nouvelle Grenade.

About a dozen items.

Vénézuéla.

7 items.

Jamaique.

5 items.

(4) Simple numbered South Seas catalogue

Marquesas 1-158; Tahiti 159-195; Pomatou 196-210; Sandwich 231-233; Gambier 234-238; Hamoa 239-247; Tonga 248-259; Viti 260-283; New Zealand 284-292; Savage 293; Cook Islands 293-305; Mulgrave 306-308; New Holland 309-328.

This is the largest by number of any of the lists (New Holland, to cite the most obvious example, here has 19 entries, most notably including a second boomerang). Unlike the other catalogue (3), this is numbered and several of the items are more fully described. There is so much continuity between the two lists, that this is clearly Radiguet's attempt to properly catalogue the items from the simpler handlist. The necklace given to Madame de Dombasle, for example, has the added note that she acquired it in September 1848.

This makes the list of New Holland items particularly significant, not least for the number from "Victoria" (so named).

(5) Working papers

A small group of rough papers, including:

Single-page numbered list, similar to the sheets in (4) but with unillustrated and more heavily corrected: probably an intermediary working list of 38 items.

Five-page handlist of items from 'Perou et Mexique' (53 items), 'Egyptien' (99), 'Sauvage' (32), 'Romains et Grecs' (14), and undesignated (23). The pages of this MS water-damaged in the top corner.

Two-page list in pencil, including items recognisable from other sections of the archive, but here almost entirely struck-through or scribbled-out.

Provenance: Collection of Jean-Paul Morin, avid ethnographical and voyage collector and bibliophile.

Numa Broc, Dictionnaire illustré des explorateurs et grands voyageurs français du XIXe siècle, Amérique, p. 270 et Océanie, pp. 329-330; Vapereau, Dictionnaire universel des contemporains, 6e édition, p. 1293.

Condition Report: Generally in very good original condition, a few pages with marginal water damage.

Price (AUD): $58,500.00

US$38,875.83   Other currencies

Ref: #5000257

Condition Report