The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title]. Henry Charles ANDREWS.
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].

The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions… [engraved title].
The Botanist's Repository, comprising colour'd engravings of new and rare plants only, with botanical descriptions in Latin and English after the Linnaean system [engraved title].

London: T. Bensley, for the author, 1797-1815.

A fine set of 10 volumes quarto, with in total 10 engraved titles and 664 exquisite hand-coloured plates (many folding), bound in original half green morocco with marbled boards, lettered in gilt.

With magnificent hand-coloured plates depicting Australian plants

A fine set of the rarest of the famous botanical journals of the late-Georgian era, with superb hand-coloured plates by Henry Andrews. The dates of publication, from 1797-1815, bracket perfectly the greatest early phase of both the collecting but also the European cultivation of Australian plants, most notably taking in the collecting work done by key early Australian figures such as William Paterson and Philip King, but equally interesting as regards the cultivation of the various plants in the grand houses and botanic gardens of England, with frequent references to Sir James Edward Smith and Sir Joseph Banks. As a result, this set includes striking illustrations of a remarkable 72 Australian and Norfolk Island plants, most with a lengthy accompanying note which provides further insight into how and when each was collected, and where it was grown.

A fine set of the rarest of the famous botanical journals of the late-Georgian era, with superb hand-coloured plates by Henry Andrews. The dates of publication, from 1797-1815, bracket perfectly the greatest early phase of both the collecting but also the European cultivation of Australian plants, most notably taking in the collecting work done by key early Australian figures such as William Paterson and Philip King, but equally interesting as regards the cultivation of the various plants in the grand houses and botanic gardens of England, with frequent references to Sir James Edward Smith and Sir Joseph Banks. As a result, this set includes striking illustrations of a remarkable 72 Australian and Norfolk Island plants, most with a lengthy accompanying note which provides further insight into how and when each was collected, and where it was grown.

---

Henry Charles Andrews was an English botanist who was perfectly positioned to survey the newest exotic plants being grown in England, because his father-in-law was John Kennedy of Hammersmith, one half of Lee & Kennedy, the most important nursery partnership to promote the cultivation of exotics in Britain. It was Lee & Kennedy who saw the opportunity for the acquisition of new rarities in Botany Bay, and their Hammersmith nursery not only offered the first Sydney plants being grown for sale, but developed a specialist role in the growing of New Holland plants generally. Both moved in the first circles: Lee was particularly close to Banks, while Kennedy had more of a roving commission, and became the most important commercial supplier of Josephine's garden at Malmaison (he is said to have had a passport for free passage even during the war). Kennedy himself supplied much of the text for this work, later helped by others including Adrian Haworth and George Jackson.

The descriptions are particularly interesting for the light they shine on the whole process. The Correa Alba, to take an example almost at random, is said to have been first raised in England in 1793 by J. Vere Esq., of Kensington-gore, from seeds given to him by Sir Joseph Banks. Scores of plants are described from the Hammersmith nursery, including many Australian plants listed as growing there as early as 1790 or 1791. The flowering of the Styphelia Viridis, (illustrated on back cover) is accompanied by the comment that all of the plants of this species 'at present in Britain… are the offspring of one solitary seed, received by Messrs. Lee and Kennedy from New Holland, in the year 1791.' It is also intriguing to note the close relationship that existed between Lee & Kennedy and Lieutenant-Governor William Paterson, who sent an impressive number of plants from Norfolk Island and New South Wales. Another particularly interesting patron is Aylmer Bourke Lambert, the grand old man of English botany, closely associated with the Australian plants sent back by Surgeon John White and Governor King (King is explicitly mentioned as the source on at least one occasion here). The Mimosa Elegans, for example, is described from the Lambert conservatory, with the note that it was 'at this time in no other private collection in the country.'

Morrison and Aitken, in 'Capturing Flora. 300 years of Australian botanical art', comment on plate 82 (Banksia serrata), suggesting that while Banks and Solander's specimens from Australia were limited in their scientific impact, their adoption into horticulture demonstrated their contribution to a growing "excitement of New Holland 'exoticks'".

On plate 295 (Passiflora aurantia, the Norfolk Island passion-flower) Morrison and Aitken quote Lee and Kennedy, the first to cultivate it in England; 'as an addition to the very few handsome climbing plants fit to decorate the trellis-work of our modern greenhouses, or conservatories, this plant must be considered as a great acquisition'.

On plate 400, Morrison and Aitken comment that Eucalyptus resinifera, the Australian Red Mahagony, first flowered in Europe in 1804 at Lady de Clifford's renowned plant houses at Paddington.

Unusually, the first volume retains a printed title alongside the engraved title (normally the letterpress titles were discarded by binders). Throughout, each plate is accompanied by a leaf of letterpress text, and each volume has an index leaf; in addition, the first volume has a leaf of preface and errata, the fifth has an index leaf to vols 1-5, and the tenth has a leaf of index to volumes 6-10.

This item can be seen in our latest catalogue.

Provenance: From a European collection.

Nissen BBI, 2382; Sitwell and Blunt, 'Great Flower Books', p. 83; Morrison and Aitken, 'Capturing Flora', p. 88.

Condition Report: A few scattered age marks, overall in very good condition.

Price (AUD): $65,000.00

US$45,910.68   Other currencies

Ref: #4505239

Condition Report