Scripta, quae extant, omnia, et historica et rhetorica. Opera & studio Friderici Sylburgii Veterensis. of Halicarnassus DIONYSIUS.
Scripta, quae extant, omnia, et historica et rhetorica. Opera & studio Friderici Sylburgii Veterensis.
Scripta, quae extant, omnia, et historica et rhetorica. Opera & studio Friderici Sylburgii Veterensis.
Scripta, quae extant, omnia, et historica et rhetorica. Opera & studio Friderici Sylburgii Veterensis.
Scripta, quae extant, omnia, et historica et rhetorica. Opera & studio Friderici Sylburgii Veterensis.
Scripta, quae extant, omnia, et historica et rhetorica. Opera & studio Friderici Sylburgii Veterensis.

Scripta, quae extant, omnia…
Scripta, quae extant, omnia, et historica et rhetorica. Opera & studio Friderici Sylburgii Veterensis.

Leipzig: Maurits Georg Weidmann (literis Christophori Guntheri), 1691.

Two volumes in one, folio, title-pages in black and red with vignettes of terrestrial and celestial spheres; contemporary sprinkled calf, spine lettered in gilt and panelled in gilt between raised bands.

Romulus and Remus, and the history of Rome

A splendid printing in Greek and roman types, mostly in parallel, of the surviving works of Dionysius Halicarnassensis, the Greek historian and rhetorician who moved to Rome around 30 BCE and flourished during the reign of Augustus Caesar. He spent two decades studying Latin and its literature and preparing to write his substantial history of Rome (''Roman Antiquities''), which told the history of Rome from the mythical period to the beginning of the First Punic War. More than half the original work survived into the age of printing and some of the remainder was recovered as quotations in the works of others. He argued in favour of the rule of Rome, maintaining that the Romans were the true descendants of the original Greeks. He and Livy were long considered as having provided the only connected and detailed extant accounts of early Roman history. He was in fact a source for both Livy and Plutarch. He was also one of the primary sources for the accounts of the foundation of Rome and the myth of Romulus and Remus.

A splendid printing in Greek and roman types, mostly in parallel, of the surviving works of Dionysius Halicarnassensis, the Greek historian and rhetorician who moved to Rome around 30 BCE and flourished during the reign of Augustus Caesar. He spent two decades studying Latin and its literature and preparing to write his substantial history of Rome (''Roman Antiquities''), which told the history of Rome from the mythical period to the beginning of the First Punic War. More than half the original work survived into the age of printing and some of the remainder was recovered as quotations in the works of others. He argued in favour of the rule of Rome, maintaining that the Romans were the true descendants of the original Greeks. He and Livy were long considered as having provided the only connected and detailed extant accounts of early Roman history. He was in fact a source for both Livy and Plutarch. He was also one of the primary sources for the accounts of the foundation of Rome and the myth of Romulus and Remus.

This is the reissue of the edition published at Frankfurt in 1586, edited by Friedrich Sylburg: 'A thorough knowledge of Greek, considerable critical acumen, and an intelligent application of great powers of work were the main characteristics of Friedrich Sylburg, 1536-1596'. (Sandys 2, p. 270).

Provenance: Alexander Grant, Scottish and English parliamentarian (inscribed on title-page and dated 1697, armorial bookplate "The Honble. Allexander Grant, younger of that ilk").

Dibdin 1,508; Brunet 2,725; Graesse 2,400; Ebert 6222.

Price (AUD): $900.00

US$643.27   Other currencies

Ref: #4505197