Carte des Costes de l'Asie sur l'Ocean contenant les Bancs Isles et Costes &c…. Pierre MORTIER.

Carte des Costes de l'Asie sur l'Ocean contenant les Bancs Isles et Costes &c…
Carte des Costes de l'Asie sur l'Ocean contenant les Bancs Isles et Costes &c…

Amsterdam: Pierre Mortier, circa 1700.

Engraved map, 565 x 860 mm (map size); contemporary hand-colouring, framed.

Dutch seventeenth century map of the Australian coast

First issue of Mortier's important and highly attractive large format Dutch map depicting the "coasts of Asia" and including a good and substantial early depiction of the Australian coast, showing VOC voyages from Hartog (1616) to Tasman (1642-1644). The map is unusually detailed regarding the Dutch voyagers in Australian waters, with the stretches of coast they explored named, including the now familiar rollcall of captains such as Houtman (1619), Leeuwin (1622), Carstensz (1623), de Wit (1625) and Nuyt (1627). The fact that the outline of Australia retains the same basic shape it had had since the mid seventeenth-century, is testament to the hiatus in major European voyages in the region, although the map does inadvertently improve the relative position of Tasmania compared to other Mortier maps of the era, which had shown the island too far to the west (much like the Thevenot map which is the original source).

First issue of Mortier's important and highly attractive large format Dutch map depicting the "coasts of Asia" and including a good and substantial early depiction of the Australian coast, showing VOC voyages from Hartog (1616) to Tasman (1642-1644). The map is unusually detailed regarding the Dutch voyagers in Australian waters, with the stretches of coast they explored named, including the now familiar rollcall of captains such as Houtman (1619), Leeuwin (1622), Carstensz (1623), de Wit (1625) and Nuyt (1627). The fact that the outline of Australia retains the same basic shape it had had since the mid seventeenth-century, is testament to the hiatus in major European voyages in the region, although the map does inadvertently improve the relative position of Tasmania compared to other Mortier maps of the era, which had shown the island too far to the west (much like the Thevenot map which is the original source).
One of the more remarkable aspects of the map is that it includes an attempt to clarify the question of New Guinea and the Torres Strait at a time when the region was very poorly understood, and actually notices landfalls made by Luís vaz de Torres, although his name is not specifically mentioned: of course, it was not until the time of Captain Cook and the Admiralty hydrographer Alexander Dalrymple that this region was better understood. The mapping of the west coast of Cape York is based on the 1623 Carstensz voyage, and not the earlier explorations of Janszoon on the Duyfken.
This is the rarer Pierre [Pieter] Mortier issue: a Huguenot émigré, Mortier (1661-1711) established his mapmaking business in Amsterdam when he was given the privilege of printing French maps in Holland in 1690. After his death in 1711 his widow continued the business until 1719, when their son Cornelius took over, establishing the famous firm of Mortier and Covens with his partner Johannes Coven in 1721. An unchanged version of the map with the "Mortier & Covens" imprint was later issued by the company.

Tooley, p. 209.

Price (AUD): $6,750.00  other currencies     Ref: #4504986

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