A Voyage to the South Sea, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, for the purpose of conveying the Bread-fruit Tree to the West Indies, in His Majesty's Ship the Bounty… London, George Nicol, 1792 [including] A narrative of the mutiny, on board his Majesty's ship Bounty; and the subsequent voyage of part of the crew, in the ship's boat, from Tofoa, one of the Friendly Islands, to Timor, a Dutch settlement in the East Indies. Written by Lieutenant William Bligh. London, George Nicol, 1790. William BLIGH.
A Voyage to the South Sea, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, for the purpose of conveying the Bread-fruit Tree to the West Indies, in His Majesty's Ship the Bounty… London, George Nicol, 1792 [including] A narrative of the mutiny, on board his Majesty's ship Bounty; and the subsequent voyage of part of the crew, in the ship's boat, from Tofoa, one of the Friendly Islands, to Timor, a Dutch settlement in the East Indies. Written by Lieutenant William Bligh. London, George Nicol, 1790.
A Voyage to the South Sea, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, for the purpose of conveying the Bread-fruit Tree to the West Indies, in His Majesty's Ship the Bounty… London, George Nicol, 1792 [including] A narrative of the mutiny, on board his Majesty's ship Bounty; and the subsequent voyage of part of the crew, in the ship's boat, from Tofoa, one of the Friendly Islands, to Timor, a Dutch settlement in the East Indies. Written by Lieutenant William Bligh. London, George Nicol, 1790.
A Voyage to the South Sea, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, for the purpose of conveying the Bread-fruit Tree to the West Indies, in His Majesty's Ship the Bounty… London, George Nicol, 1792 [including] A narrative of the mutiny, on board his Majesty's ship Bounty; and the subsequent voyage of part of the crew, in the ship's boat, from Tofoa, one of the Friendly Islands, to Timor, a Dutch settlement in the East Indies. Written by Lieutenant William Bligh. London, George Nicol, 1790.

A Voyage to the South Sea, undertaken by Command of His Majesty…
A Voyage to the South Sea, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, undertaken by Command of His Majesty, for the purpose of conveying the Bread-fruit Tree to the West Indies, in His Majesty's Ship the Bounty… London, George Nicol, 1792 [including] A narrative of the mutiny, on board his Majesty's ship Bounty; and the subsequent voyage of part of the crew, in the ship's boat, from Tofoa, one of the Friendly Islands, to Timor, a Dutch settlement in the East Indies. Written by Lieutenant William Bligh. London, George Nicol, 1790.

London: George Nicol, 1790-1792.

Quarto, pp. [x], 1-153, [1, blank]; iv, 88, [1, blank]; 246-264, with a portrait of Bligh and seven plates and charts, some folding; occasional light browning and faint offsetting from the plates and charts (as often), but an outstanding copy in contemporary tree calf.

A Bligh rarity: the advance composite issue of his two major works

The very rare special issue of Bligh's two works on the mutiny and voyage of the Bounty. His Narrative of the mutiny, on board his Majesty's ship Bounty was published quickly in 1790 when he reasoned that to safeguard his reputation he would need his version of events publicly available, and in such a form that he could present copies to the Lords of the Admiralty before the court-martial of the mutineers. Two years later, in 1792, he published his full account of the voyage as A Voyage to the South Sea, which placed the mutiny account within the narrative, reprinting it on pp. 153-246. Recognising that purchasers of the "Mutiny" might feel a little misused, the publisher inserted a note in the "Advertisement" to the full account explaining that "for the accommodation of the purchasers of the Narrative already published, those who desire it, will be supplied with the other parts of the Voyage separate; i.e., the part previous to the mutiny, and the additional account after leaving Timor".

The very rare special issue of Bligh's two works on the mutiny and voyage of the Bounty. His Narrative of the mutiny, on board his Majesty's ship Bounty was published quickly in 1790 when he reasoned that to safeguard his reputation he would need his version of events publicly available, and in such a form that he could present copies to the Lords of the Admiralty before the court-martial of the mutineers. Two years later, in 1792, he published his full account of the voyage as A Voyage to the South Sea, which placed the mutiny account within the narrative, reprinting it on pp. 153-246. Recognising that purchasers of the "Mutiny" might feel a little misused, the publisher inserted a note in the "Advertisement" to the full account explaining that "for the accommodation of the purchasers of the Narrative already published, those who desire it, will be supplied with the other parts of the Voyage separate; i.e., the part previous to the mutiny, and the additional account after leaving Timor".
This is an example of the rare composite (sometimes described as "advance") issue as advertised, a deliberate separate issue with pp. 154 and 245 of the "Voyage" left blank so that the "Mutiny" narrative follows and precedes the other text as it should, presenting a complete and continuous narrative.
Such is the rarity of this special issue that on its few market appearances it has been celebrated: in 1964 Maggs Bros. remarked that 'we have only handled three copies' (Voyages and travels IV, item 1402); Ferguson, in 1941, could cite just the Mitchell Library copy while the Addenda adds a copy in the National Library of Australia. It is not described by ESTC. On the market the most recent sale known to Wantrup was that of the Australian collector F. G. Coles in 1965, but subsequently, also in Australia, Rodney Davidson acquired a copy, which was sold in 2005 (Australian Book Auctions, 7 March 2005, lot 111, $39,610). Another copy came onto the market with the Brooke-Hitching collection (Sotheby, 27 March 2014, lot 143, £21,250).
As is usual leaf C1 in the "Mutiny" is a cancel with the correct reading "… account to King and country for the misfortune …

Provenance: Charles Shaw-Lefevre, first Viscount Eversley (1794–1888), sometime speaker of the House of Commons, with armorial bookplate.

Ferguson 126; Kroepelien, 93n ('extremely rare… not seen'); O'Reilly-Reitman, 551; Wantrup, 62b.

Price (AUD): $44,000.00  other currencies     Ref: #4504910

Condition Report