A History of Greece… New edition…. Connop THIRLWALL.

A History of Greece… New edition…
A History of Greece… New edition…

London: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans, 1855.

Eight volumes, octavo; with 13 maps, seven of them folding and backed on silk; in an attractive contemporary binding of half red morocco, spines with gilt ruled raised bands, gilt lettered direct, marbled endpapers, top edges gilt; binding by "Tuskett, Binder to the Queen"

New edition (first published over a ten-year period from 1835) of this important evidence-based history of Greece. "Compared with Grote's history it lacks enthusiasm for a definite political ideal and is written entirely from the standpoint of a scholar. It shows a more impartial treatment of the evidence, especially in respect of the aristocratic and absolute governments of Greece. For these reasons its popularity was not so immediate as that of Grote's work, but its substantial merits were later recognised". It "entailed prodigious labour. At Cambridge, where the first volume was written, he used to work all day until half-past three, when he left his rooms for a rapid walk before dinner, at that time served in hall at four; in Yorkshire he is said to have worked sixteen hours a day in his study. By a curious coincidence he and George Grote, his friend and schoolfellow [at Charterhouse], were writing on the same subject at the same time, unknown to each other. On the appearance of Grote's first two volumes in 1846 Thirlwall welcomed them with generous praise ? Grote in the preface to his work bore testimony to Thirlwall's learning, sagacity, and candour" (ODNB)

New edition (first published over a ten-year period from 1835) of this important evidence-based history of Greece. "Compared with Grote's history it lacks enthusiasm for a definite political ideal and is written entirely from the standpoint of a scholar. It shows a more impartial treatment of the evidence, especially in respect of the aristocratic and absolute governments of Greece. For these reasons its popularity was not so immediate as that of Grote's work, but its substantial merits were later recognised". It "entailed prodigious labour. At Cambridge, where the first volume was written, he used to work all day until half-past three, when he left his rooms for a rapid walk before dinner, at that time served in hall at four; in Yorkshire he is said to have worked sixteen hours a day in his study. By a curious coincidence he and George Grote, his friend and schoolfellow [at Charterhouse], were writing on the same subject at the same time, unknown to each other. On the appearance of Grote's first two volumes in 1846 Thirlwall welcomed them with generous praise ? Grote in the preface to his work bore testimony to Thirlwall's learning, sagacity, and candour" (ODNB)

John Sterling may have drawn rather a long bow in pronouncing Thirlwall "a writer as great as Thucydides and Tacitus, and with far more knowledge than they". John Stuart Mill thought Thirlwall, who was bishop of St David's, the best orator he had ever heard, though Carlyle summed him up as "A right solid, honest-hearted man, full of knowledge and sense, and, in spite of his positive temper, almost timid."

Provenance: Ex libris University of Surrey, Roehampton with their stamp to fore-edge of each volume and the bookplates of the Young Memorial Library, Kingham Hill to front paste-downs.

Price (AUD): $1,685.00  other currencies Ref: #4504703