Louis de Freycinet's corrected proof engraving of plate 82 of the Freycinet voyage's Atlas Historique (1826): "Iles Sandwich", a triple-portrait of Hawaiian dignitaries. FREYCINET VOYAGE: HAWAII, Alphonse PELLION, after, Adrian MIGNERET.

Louis de Freycinet's corrected proof engraving of plate 82 of his voyage Atlas Historique (of 1826): "Iles Sandwich".
Louis de Freycinet's corrected proof engraving of plate 82 of the Freycinet voyage's Atlas Historique (1826): "Iles Sandwich", a triple-portrait of Hawaiian dignitaries.

Paris: circa 1825.

Early black-and-white proof engraving before addition of colour; manuscript colour notes in ink, bold ink note at top referring to an original drawing.

Louis de Freycinet's annotated proof engraving of Hawaiian dignitaries

Freycinet's annotated proof of Alphonse Pellion's engraved triple-portrait of Hawaiian dignitaries encountered during the visit of the voyage of the Uranie to the Hawaiian islands in August 1819. The portraits depict, from left to right, "one of the principal chiefs of Oahu"; Kiaïmoukou or "George Cox", the Royal governor of Maui; and "one of Kiaïmoukou's principal officers". More properly known as George Cox Kahekili Ke'eaumoku II, the governor of Maui had taken the English names of George and Cox to honour, respectively, the king of England and a sea captain who had befriended him. Hawaiians knew him as 'Pu?u Nui ("Great Pile"). The name refers to the rotting piles of excess goods outside his storehouses. In the true Hawaiian double entendre, the name also accurately described his physique: members of his family were known to be enormous' (Samuel Kamakau, Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii, 1961).

Freycinet's annotated proof of Alphonse Pellion's engraved triple-portrait of Hawaiian dignitaries encountered during the visit of the voyage of the Uranie to the Hawaiian islands in August 1819. The portraits depict, from left to right, "one of the principal chiefs of Oahu"; Kiaïmoukou or "George Cox", the Royal governor of Maui; and "one of Kiaïmoukou's principal officers". More properly known as George Cox Kahekili Ke'eaumoku II, the governor of Maui had taken the English names of George and Cox to honour, respectively, the king of England and a sea captain who had befriended him. Hawaiians knew him as 'Pu?u Nui ("Great Pile"). The name refers to the rotting piles of excess goods outside his storehouses. In the true Hawaiian double entendre, the name also accurately described his physique: members of his family were known to be enormous' (Samuel Kamakau, Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii, 1961).
Freycinet has boldly annotated the proof engraving with colour notes in his familiar ink notation. The hat at left needs to be depicted as "chapeau de paille"; Ke'eaumoku's robe should be "draperies rouge or bleu"; and the officer at right is to have his hair ribbon "bleu clair", his "gilet" black, and his neckerchief to be coloured. Generally for the colours he notes "N.B. pour la couleur des figures consultez le dessin ci-joint". The plate as published follows these colour notes; it appears as plate 82 in the 1825 Atlas Historique of Freycinet's huge Voyage autour du monde.
Such care in preparation of the images for the official published account of the Uranie voyage is typical of the work of Louis de Freycinet. The meetings in 1819 between the French and the Hawaiians were of great importance and to have evidence of the desire for exactness in representation is significant.

Provenance: From the family of Louis de Freycinet.

Price (AUD): $9,500.00  other currencies     Ref: #4504622