Mr. Wentworth's Letter of Impeachment… [contained in] A Return of all the Letters addressed by… the Secretary of State for the Colonies, in reply to Governor Darling's Despatches, relative to the Punishment and Death of Private Joseph Sudds…. DARLING: SUDDS AND THOMPSON CASE, William Charles WENTWORTH.
Mr. Wentworth's Letter of Impeachment… [contained in] A Return of all the Letters addressed by… the Secretary of State for the Colonies, in reply to Governor Darling's Despatches, relative to the Punishment and Death of Private Joseph Sudds…

Mr. Wentworth's Letter of Impeachment… [contained in] A Return of all the Letters…
Mr. Wentworth's Letter of Impeachment… [contained in] A Return of all the Letters addressed by… the Secretary of State for the Colonies, in reply to Governor Darling's Despatches, relative to the Punishment and Death of Private Joseph Sudds…

London: Ordered, by the House of Commons, to be printed, 20 July 1832.

Folio, 55 pp. and docket title; in a modern binding of quarter leather.

W.C. Wentworth goes for Governor Darling in the Sudds case

One of the key pieces in the controversy over Governor Darling's handling of the Sudds-Thomson case, an affair which embroiled the Governor along with key figures in the colony over nearly ten years. This government printing is notable for containing the very long (35 pages) "Letter of Impeachment" published by William Charles Wentworth in his newspaper The Australian. It was a key piece in Wentworth's noisy and articulate fight against autocracy and his defence of the emancipists, though -- as Michael Persse notes in his ADB article on Wentworth -- the 'draft of 'impeachment' prepared by Wentworth against Darling did little damage to the governor's reputation at the Colonial Office, but it certainly undermined Wentworth's, so intemperate was its language'.

One of the key pieces in the controversy over Governor Darling's handling of the Sudds-Thomson case, an affair which embroiled the Governor along with key figures in the colony over nearly ten years. This government printing is notable for containing the very long (35 pages) "Letter of Impeachment" published by William Charles Wentworth in his newspaper The Australian. It was a key piece in Wentworth's noisy and articulate fight against autocracy and his defence of the emancipists, though -- as Michael Persse notes in his ADB article on Wentworth -- the 'draft of 'impeachment' prepared by Wentworth against Darling did little damage to the governor's reputation at the Colonial Office, but it certainly undermined Wentworth's, so intemperate was its language'.

Darling served his full term as governor, ultimately vindicated though it had been a long battle. Wentworth threw an immense party on his Vaucluse estate to celebrate the Governor's departure from the colony in 1831 where, so the newspaper reported, 'upward of 4,000 persons assembled at Vaucluse to partake of Mr Wentworth's hospitality and to evince joy at the approaching departure. The scene of the fête was on the lawn in front of Mr Wentworth's villa, which was thrown open for the reception of all respectable visitants, while a marquee filled with piles of loaves and casks of Cooper's gin and Wright's strong beer, was pitched a short way off. On an immense spit a bullock was roasted entire. Twelve sheep were also roasted in succession; and 4,000 loaves completed the enormous banquet. By 7 p.m. two immense bonfires were lighted on the highest hill … Rustic sports, speeches, etc., etc., whiled away the night; and morning dawned before the hospitable mansion was quitted by all its guests'.

Ferguson, 1193.

Condition Report: A few spots towards the end; neat old library stamp on docket title.

Price (AUD): $4,750.00

US$3,568.41   Other currencies

Ref: #4504447

Condition Report