Report from the Select Committee on Transportation; together with the Minutes of Evidence, Appendix, and Index, CONVICTS, TRANSPORTATION: MOLESWORTH REPORT.
Report from the Select Committee on Transportation; together with the Minutes of Evidence, Appendix, and Index,

Report from the Select Committee on Transportation...
Report from the Select Committee on Transportation; together with the Minutes of Evidence, Appendix, and Index,

London: Ordered, by the House of Commons, to be printed, 3 August 1838.

Folio, [ii], i-[l], 330, 44 pp.; with an additional series title-page (Reports from Committees 1837-8... Sixteenth Volume); complete with errata slip, in a neat modern binding of green cloth with printed paper label.

Molesworth sinks transportation: the 1838 report

The last major parliamentary report in the history of transportation, and the work which precipitated the demise of the convict system in eastern Australia. The sheer scale of the report, and the number of witnesses called, makes this one of the most important reports on colonial Australia.

The last major parliamentary report in the history of transportation, and the work which precipitated the demise of the convict system in eastern Australia. The sheer scale of the report, and the number of witnesses called, makes this one of the most important reports on colonial Australia.

Known by the name of its chairman, the British politician and parliamentary reformer Sir William Molesworth (1810-1855), the Molesworth report was deeply critical of the convict system as intrinsically unfair, inefficient, expensive and morally problematic. Upon publication the findings fuelled popular movements against transportation both in Australia and Britain, where it provided impetus to penal reformers. Although transportation continued for years to come the vast majority of convicts were diverted from New South Wales and sent to Van Diemen's Land. Significantly, the committee exposed outrageous abuses of recidivist felons that shamed English moral sensibility and led to further reforms such as Captain Maconochie's Norfolk Island experiment. So began the era of prison building in Victorian Britain, with penitentiaries planned as places of both punishment and moral rehabilitation.

Provenance: Law Society (UK) with their library-stamps.

Ferguson, 2500.

Price (AUD): $2,750.00  other currencies     Ref: #4504398

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