To The Frozen South.

Hobart: Davies Brothers Limited. 1924.

Quarto, with a map, 48 full-page photographic illustrations, portrait of Captain Larsen; original boards and cloth spine, front board lettered in gilt.

Alan Villiers' scarce first book

First and only edition of Villiers' first book, published in Tasmania and very scarce. Villiers, following an accident at sea, was a 20-year-old journalist at the Hobart Mercury newspaper in 1923. As the wikipedia article notes, 'the call of the sea was strong, and soon Villiers was back at sea when the great explorer and whaler Carl Anton Larsen and his whaling factory ship, the Sir James Clark Ross came to port with five whale chasers in tow in late 1923. His accounts of the trip would eventually be published as Whaling in the Frozen South. Named for the Antarctica explorer James Clark Ross, the Ross was the largest whale factory ship in the world, weighing in at 12,000 tons. She was headed for the southern Ross Sea, the last whale stronghold left. Villiers writes: "We had caught 228, most of them blues, the biggest over 100 feet long. These yielded 17,000 barrels of oil; we had hoped for at least 40,000, with luck 60,000"…'.

First and only edition of Villiers' first book, published in Tasmania and very scarce. Villiers, following an accident at sea, was a 20-year-old journalist at the Hobart Mercury newspaper in 1923. As the wikipedia article notes, 'the call of the sea was strong, and soon Villiers was back at sea when the great explorer and whaler Carl Anton Larsen and his whaling factory ship, the Sir James Clark Ross came to port with five whale chasers in tow in late 1923. His accounts of the trip would eventually be published as Whaling in the Frozen South. Named for the Antarctica explorer James Clark Ross, the Ross was the largest whale factory ship in the world, weighing in at 12,000 tons. She was headed for the southern Ross Sea, the last whale stronghold left. Villiers writes: "We had caught 228, most of them blues, the biggest over 100 feet long. These yielded 17,000 barrels of oil; we had hoped for at least 40,000, with luck 60,000"…'.

Villiers' later Whaling in the Frozen South was published in several editions starting the year after this. This rare narrative, his first publication on the expedition, was based on the articles that he prepared for his newspaper employer the Mercury. It is not recorded by Rosove as it falls just outside the bibliography's date parameters. 

Provenance: Private collection (Australia)

Renard, 1645; not in Spence.

Condition Report: Slight wear at head and tail of spine; otherwise excellent.

Price (AUD): $350.00

US$238.08   Other currencies

Ref: #4504326

Condition Report