Embothrium Speciosissimum. SMITH, James SOWERBY.

Embothrium Speciosissimum…
Embothrium Speciosissimum

London: Published by J. Sowerby & Co, 1793.

Hand coloured engraved plate, 235 x 170mm, mounted and in a handsome nineteenth century timber frame.

The first engraved image of the magnificent waratah

This superb image, 'the most magnificent plant which the prolific soil of New Holland affords is, by common consent both of Europeans and Natives, the Waratah. It is more over a favourite with the latter, upon account of a rich honeyed juice which they sip from its flowers." (Smith)

This superb image, 'the most magnificent plant which the prolific soil of New Holland affords is, by common consent both of Europeans and Natives, the Waratah. It is more over a favourite with the latter, upon account of a rich honeyed juice which they sip from its flowers." (Smith)
The engraver James Sowerby was a natural historian and artist, he collaborated with James Smith (1759–1828), one of the first botanists to work on the plant specimens sent back to England from the new colony. In 1793 Smith and Sowerby produced the first publication devoted to Australian flora, A Specimen of the Botany of New Holland. This was the first time that the Waratah was described and Edwards gave the species its original binomial name, Embothrium speciosissimum.
Interestingly Edwards notes that this engraving was drawn from a coloured drawing made from the wild plant, compared with the very fine dried specimens sent by Mr White.

Nissen, 1861; Sitwell and Blunt, Great Flower Books, p.76.

Price (AUD): $5,850.00  other currencies     Ref: #4504199