"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl. TASMANIAN CLIPPER TRADE, SUNDERLAND LUSTREWARE.
"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.
"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.
"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.
"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.
"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.
"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.
"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.
"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.

"Star of Tasmania": English Sunderland commemorative bowl.

Northern England: circa 1860.

Sunderland lustreware bowl, diameter 230 mm.

Star of Tasmania 'The destined port in mind to keep'...

Fine lustreware bowl depicting the clipper Star of Tasmania built in Aberdeen in 1856. Such fragile nineteenth-century ceramics relating to Australia and New Zealand are exceedingly uncommon, and this example reflects the optimism arising from the cessation of convict transportation to Tasmania. The bowl bears the inscription "Star of Tasmania" and specifically depicts the clipper with her low profile and abundant sail – a marvel of British shipbuilding of the mid-nineteenth century. Among the printed sentimental ditties that adorn the bowl is a romantic depiction of a sailor and his beloved, flanked by the Union Jack with a lighthouse and ship at anchor in the background.

Fine lustreware bowl depicting the clipper Star of Tasmania built in Aberdeen in 1856. Such fragile nineteenth-century ceramics relating to Australia and New Zealand are exceedingly uncommon, and this example reflects the optimism arising from the cessation of convict transportation to Tasmania. The bowl bears the inscription "Star of Tasmania" and specifically depicts the clipper with her low profile and abundant sail – a marvel of British shipbuilding of the mid-nineteenth century. Among the printed sentimental ditties that adorn the bowl is a romantic depiction of a sailor and his beloved, flanked by the Union Jack with a lighthouse and ship at anchor in the background.
Following the cease of convict transportation, Van Diemen's Land was renamed Tasmania in 1856 in an effort to distance the colony from her somewhat dire reputation. The change in name heralded a new age for trade and free settlement, accordingly the clipper completed in 1856 by Alexander Hall & Sons of Aberdeen was christened the Star of Tasmania. She departed in July of 1856 and arrived in Launceston mid–October. An article in the Hobart Colonial Times published mid-October 1856 reflects contemporary admiration in the colony: 'The "Star of Tasmania" draws 16 feet 6 inches with full cargo… She is said to be the most beautiful piece of naval architecture. Her saloon and ladies cabins are spacious and elegantly fitted up. Her accommodation for a large number of passengers is excellent throughout.'
The same article boasts her very fast passage of 80 days from Britain to Tasmania: 'This beautiful clipper ship has made an excellent run. She left Gravesend on 16 July, the Downs on the 18th, and passed the Lizard Light on the 25th, sighted Madeira on the 4th, and crossed the line on the 21st August, passed the Meridian of Greenwich on the 13th September, and from that to the Cape she had to struggle against baffling winds, but made the Tamar heads from the Cape in 25 days; making the passage from parting the pilot at the Lizard [UK], to taking up the Tamar pilot [Northern Tasmania], in 80 days.'
The Star of Tasmania fulfilled dual roles as a wool clipper and passenger ship, working routes between Britain, Tasmania and New Zealand for 12 years until wrecked at Otago in 1868. The circumstances of her loss were appalling: caught during a freak storm while moored in Oamaru harbour, the Star of Tasmania broke her cable and could not be secured despite desperate efforts of the crew. Two small boys and two sailors were drowned before the remaining passengers were relayed to shore via a safety line. This once beautiful ship was broken up so that 'in the morning very little of her was to be seen' and some 2100 bales of wool were lost (Cornwall Chronicle 29 February 1868). Curiously, one of the ditties that adorn this bowl reflects the dangers that lay ahead:
"Now weight the anchor hoist the sail
Launch upon the pathless deep
Resolved however veers the gale
The destined port in mind to keep
Through all the dangers of the way
Deliver us good Lord we pray".

Price (AUD): $9,250.00  other currencies     Ref: #4504108

Condition Report