Journal of the Resolution's Voyage, In 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775. COOK: SECOND VOYAGE, John MARRA.
Journal of the Resolution's Voyage, In 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775.
Journal of the Resolution's Voyage, In 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775.

Journal of the Resolution's Voyage…
Journal of the Resolution's Voyage, In 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775.

London: F. Newbery, 1775.

Octavo, folding frontispiece map and five plates, leaf D2 a cancel as usual; in later polished light tan calf.

The first account, and first landscape view, of the Antarctic

First edition: the first full account of Cook's second voyage to have been published, and the earliest account of any Antarctic exploration. This surreptitious narrative of the voyage preceded the official account by some eighteen months. Although published anonymously, it is known to have been the work of John Marra, a Cook regular who was also to be an Australian First Fleeter. As early as September 1775 Cook was aware of the authorship: he had asked the gunner Anderson whether he had written the journal, and Anderson had convinced Marra to come forward. Amazingly, Johann Forster, the controversial naturalist of the second voyage, assisted in getting the book ready for the press (see Kroepelien, 809).

First edition: the first full account of Cook's second voyage to have been published, and the earliest account of any Antarctic exploration. This surreptitious narrative of the voyage preceded the official account by some eighteen months. Although published anonymously, it is known to have been the work of John Marra, a Cook regular who was also to be an Australian First Fleeter. As early as September 1775 Cook was aware of the authorship: he had asked the gunner Anderson whether he had written the journal, and Anderson had convinced Marra to come forward. Amazingly, Johann Forster, the controversial naturalist of the second voyage, assisted in getting the book ready for the press (see Kroepelien, 809).
The second voyage marked the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle, and John Marra's book thus contains the earliest first-hand account of the Antarctic regions, while the engravings include the earliest Antarctic landscape. Thirty-eight pages of text deal with the Antarctic visit, and the main map shows the passage of Cook's two ships to the high southern latitudes. Marra (sometimes Mara), an Irish sailor who had first sailed with Cook on the last leg of the Endeavour voyage, joined the Resolution in Batavia. A recidivist would-be deserter under Cook, Marra would reappear in history as a First Fleeter, failing again in an attempt to desert when he went bush for three days in Port Jackson in 1789. He twice attempted to jump ship during the second voyage, the second time swimming desperately for shore as the Resolution left Tahiti. This latter unsuccessful attempt was only lightly punished by Cook, who mused in his journal that any man without 'friends or connections to confine him to any part of the world' could not 'spend his days better than at one of those isles where he can injoy all the necessaries and some of the luxuries of life in ease and Plenty.' (Beaglehole, Journals, II, p. 404). He did however go on to be a gunner's mate on HMS Sirius, flagship of the First Fleet.
Although Marra was aboard the Resolution on the Cook voyage, he also gives an account of the voyage of the Adventure during the period when the two ships were separated, including mention of the time the Adventure spent on the Tasmanian coast. 'A rare work… it contains details of many events not recorded in the official account, and a preface recording the causes which led Banks and his staff to withdraw from the expedition at the last moment. Accordingly it is a vital second voyage item…' (Davidson).

Provenance: Private collection (Sydney).

Beaglehole, II, pp. cliii-clv; Beddie, 1270; Davidson, A Book Collector's Notes, p. 60; Hill, 1087; Holmes, 16; Kroepelien, 809; O'Reilly-Reitman, 379; Rosove, 214.A1.a; Spence, 758.

Price (AUD): $11,000.00  other currencies     Ref: #4503923

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