Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists. William SWAINSON.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.

Zoological Illustrations…
Zoological Illustrations, or Original Figures and Descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of Ornithology, Entomology, and Conchology, and arranged on the principles of Cuvier and other modern Zoologists.

London: Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1820-1823 & 1830-1833.

Six volumes, octavo, 318 handcoloured plates, an excellent set in uniform contemporary green half morocco over marbled boards, all edges gilt.

Including many newly discovered specimens from Australia and the South Seas

A particularly attractive set of both first and second series of this beautiful work of natural history; all published. Not only is Swainson's important work rarely offered, few examples in contemporary bindings seem to have survived as complete sets in good original condition, as here. The importance of this work to Australian and Pacific natural history cannot be overestimated: several plates feature Australian specimens - particularly birds - figured for the first time, while many of the illustrations are derived from the collections of important figures such as Sir Joseph Banks, Elizabeth Bligh, Allan Cunningham and John Byron. A plate in the second series, depicting the Jamaican "Two-Toothed Disk Snail" is from an original sketch by John Lewin, a friend of the Swainson family.

A particularly attractive set of both first and second series of this beautiful work of natural history; all published. Not only is Swainson's important work rarely offered, few examples in contemporary bindings seem to have survived as complete sets in good original condition, as here. The importance of this work to Australian and Pacific natural history cannot be overestimated: several plates feature Australian specimens - particularly birds - figured for the first time, while many of the illustrations are derived from the collections of important figures such as Sir Joseph Banks, Elizabeth Bligh, Allan Cunningham and John Byron. A plate in the second series, depicting the Jamaican "Two-Toothed Disk Snail" is from an original sketch by John Lewin, a friend of the Swainson family.
The work deals with specimens from all around the globe, with many from Java, the East Indies, and the Americas (particularly Brazil, visited by Swainson in 1816). Of great interest are the many plates illustrating specimens from the South Seas. Swainson was particularly good on shells, although was sometimes not able to be more specific than simply giving their habitat as "South Seas". There are, nonetheless, three illustrations of Australian shells, the "New Holland Mitre", the "Mitra melaniana", and the "Scaphella maculata", the last from the collection of Elizabeth Bligh. Several other South Seas shells are from the collection of Sir Joseph Banks, including the "Mitra vitatta", about which Swainson comments that "this superb shell is figured from a matchless specimen brought home by that illustrious and lamented patron of science, the late Sir J. Banks, from the Pacific Ocean".
The work is rich with images of Australian birds, with lovely depictions of the "Azure Kingsfisher", "Red-shouldered Parakeet", "Turcosine Parrakeet", "Blue-fronted Parrakeet", and the "Tabuan, or King Parrakeet" (drawn by Swainson from a live specimen). He includes an image of the "White-collared Honeysucker", with the interesting note that "Lewin's figure is so excellent, that I should not again have represented this bird, had not the plate been prepared previous to the publication of his work". Perhaps the most personal note accompanies his depiction of "Swainson's, or Blue-bellied Lory" (Trichoglossus Swainsoni), where he comments on his "pleasure at seeing our name affixed to this charming bird, and in clearing up its history. As a child we well remember our unwearied delight at seeing its figure in White's Voyage".
Swainson's friend William Elford Leach, head of zoology at the British Museum, first encouraged him to experiment with lithography so as to make drawings of animals suitable for colouring. Thus began the publication of this, his first major work, in which all of the plates are by the author; Swainson was the first illustrator and naturalist to use lithography in this way, achieving a fresh and admirable style.
This interesting group, which we list here with Swainson's original scientific designations, includes the "Yellow-tufted Honeysucker" (Melliphaga auricomis); "Red-Collared Parakeet" (Psittacus Barabandii), from a skin in the possession of Mr Leadbeater; the "Keel-billed Flycatcher" (Muscipeta carinata), "from a specimen belonging to Mr. Brookes; since which, I have received two others from New Holland"; and the so-called "New Holland variety" of the "White-eyed Warbler" (Sylvia annulosa), described by George Caley. Further, of great significance are the two birds noticed from specimens collected by Allan Cunningham, the famous natural historian and His Majesty's Botanist in New South Wales, who sent the specimens to Swainson: the "Black & White Robin" (Petroica bicolor) and the "Golden-eared Parrakeet" (Leptolophus auricomis). The latter had only recently been pictured in Edward Lear's Parrots, but Swainson criticises the "peculiarly inappropriate" name Lear gave it.
Charmingly, three Australian butterflies are also figured here, two for the first time. The first is the "Cressida Butterfly" (Cressida Heliconïdes), from two in his own collection and 'received from Van Diemans Land'. The other two, the Australian Jasia-Butterfly (Jasia Australis) and the Australian Burnet (Heleona fenestrata), are both recorded as being collected on the north-west coast of Australia by Allan Cunningham on the King voyage.

Dance, 'A History of Shell Collecting', pp. 91-2; Nissen IVB, 911; not in Ferguson; Sitwell, 'Fine Bird Books', p. 110.

Price (AUD): $23,750.00  other currencies     Ref: #4403302

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