Cenni sul Museo Civico di Milano ed Indice sistematico dei Rettili ed Anfibi…. Giorgio JAN.
Cenni sul Museo Civico di Milano ed Indice sistematico dei Rettili ed Anfibi…
Cenni sul Museo Civico di Milano ed Indice sistematico dei Rettili ed Anfibi…
Cenni sul Museo Civico di Milano ed Indice sistematico dei Rettili ed Anfibi…
Cenni sul Museo Civico di Milano ed Indice sistematico dei Rettili ed Anfibi…

Cenni sul Museo Civico di Milano…
Cenni sul Museo Civico di Milano ed Indice sistematico dei Rettili ed Anfibi…

Milano: Giacomo Pirola, 1857.

Large octavo, large folding plan, 61 pp.; in neat modern green paper boards.

The first guide to the natural history collections of Milan

Complete with the large folding plan, which gives a detailed overview of a collection of international significance, and one which included one of the most important early collections of Australian snakes and reptiles.

Complete with the large folding plan, which gives a detailed overview of a collection of international significance, and one which included one of the most important early collections of Australian snakes and reptiles.
A rare publication describing in detail the natural history collections of Milan, and particularly the collection of Reptiles and Amphibians.
The Milan Natural History Museum was founded in 1838 by naturalists Giuseppe de Cristoforis and Giorgio Jan, who donated their private collections in order to make a new collection on the newest scientific principles. The Museum opened in 1844 with Jan, an important herpetologist, botanist and naturalist, as the first Director.
An interesting and very modern feature of the museum, described at page 11, was the design of the labels of the specimens. The frame of every label of every species was coloured with a different colour according to the Continent to which each species belongs (Asia was yellow, for example, while Oceania was blue).
Sadly the collection endured almost comprehensive losses during the Second World War when it was bombed in 1943, which does make such printed guides even more significant as a reflection on what has been lost.
This guide, the first such published, includes a detailed description of the museum (pp. 1-25); an introduction to the scientific designation of reptiles and amphibians (pp. 27-33); and a detailed list of the specimens held in Milan (pp. 35-61). Of the actual specimens, the Museum had approximately 400 mammals, 1900 birds, a genuinely impressive 950 reptiles (which would have made it one of the preeminent collections in the world), and 900 fish. Included in this number are a great quantity of Australian and Pacific species: of reptiles, 39 from Australia, 1 from Tasmania, and 3 from New Zealand, together with 10 Australian amphibians. The museum also hosted any number of more familiar Australian birds and animals such as the Thylacine, platypus, echidna and many birds.

Price (AUD): $2,950.00  other currencies     Ref: #4403274

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