Report of the Committee of the Benevolent Society of New South Wales…. BENEVOLENT SOCIETY.
Report of the Committee of the Benevolent Society of New South Wales…

Report of the Committee of the Benevolent Society of New South Wales…
Report of the Committee of the Benevolent Society of New South Wales…

Sydney: "Monitor" Press, 1826.

Duodecimo, 24 pp., some foxing particularly to the title and last page; twentieth-century "Mackaness morocco"

Relief of the poor in 1820s Sydney

Early Sydney printing from the press of the Monitor. The Benevolent Society was set up 'to relieve the Poor, Distressed, the Aged, and the Infirm, and thereby to discountenance, as much as possible, Mendicity and Vagrancy…'. One of the Society's most important institutions was the Asylum on George Street, near the old Sydney Burial Ground, demolished in 1901 to make way for Central.

Early Sydney printing from the press of the Monitor. The Benevolent Society was set up 'to relieve the Poor, Distressed, the Aged, and the Infirm, and thereby to discountenance, as much as possible, Mendicity and Vagrancy…'. One of the Society's most important institutions was the Asylum on George Street, near the old Sydney Burial Ground, demolished in 1901 to make way for Central.

The Society was a veritable who's who of Sydney, with Governor Darling and his wife as patrons, and a committee that included Alexander Berry, Gregory Blaxland, Samuel Marsden, Ralph Mansfield, and William Bland (the last as "Surgeon"). The report confirms that although the Society had had some reverses, a high point had been the visit of the Darlings to the George Street Asylum, after which all of the inmates were given a dinner of roast beef, plum pudding and 'Colonial Beer.' Other iniatives include help with replacing horses and boats to deserving tradesmen, the establishment of a Dispensary, and a decision that all fines for public intoxication be given to the Society by the police - the current quarter has netted an impressive Sixty Spanish Dollars. The work also includes the Asylum Rules, the general accounts, and a list of life members.

The work was printed by Arthur Hill who was active as a publisher in Sydney from 1826-33. A bon vivant, sometime actor, and, together with his wife Ann, tavern owner, Hill arrived in Sydney as a convict on board the Mary in 1819. In 1826 he became the printer of the new Sydney paper the Monitor (edited by E.S. Hall), a paper which played a very important part in the political and social struggles of the time and was on the side of Wentworth and the Australian. Hill only remained involved with the Monitor for less than a year, but it was during this time that he also published the Reverend Threlkeld's very important Specimens of a Dialect. Hill is listed as subscribing one pound to the Society.

Ferguson, 1064.

Price (AUD): $1,200.00  other currencies Ref: #4111709

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