Account of the Murder of the Late Mr. William Weare, of Lyon's Inn… and Portraits of the Prisoners, John Thurtell, Jos. Hunt, and Wm. Probert…. TRANSPORTATION, George Henry JONES.
Account of the Murder of the Late Mr. William Weare, of Lyon's Inn… and Portraits of the Prisoners, John Thurtell, Jos. Hunt, and Wm. Probert…
Account of the Murder of the Late Mr. William Weare, of Lyon's Inn… and Portraits of the Prisoners, John Thurtell, Jos. Hunt, and Wm. Probert…

Account of the Murder of the Late Mr. William Weare…
Account of the Murder of the Late Mr. William Weare, of Lyon's Inn… and Portraits of the Prisoners, John Thurtell, Jos. Hunt, and Wm. Probert…

London: J. Nichols and Son, 1824.

Octavo, frontispiece, 2 folding maps and 3 plates, newspaper clipping tipped-in to early blank; attractive contemporary dark blue half calf over marbled boards, spine banded and gilt, rubbed, Davidson bookplate.

An uncommon title, especially in such fine condition: a famous account of the London underworld and the seedy nature of amateur boxing. One of the accomplices to the murder, Joseph Hunt, was sentenced to transportation to New South Wales, and was sent to New South Wales on the Countess of Harcourt.

An uncommon title, especially in such fine condition: a famous account of the London underworld and the seedy nature of amateur boxing. One of the accomplices to the murder, Joseph Hunt, was sentenced to transportation to New South Wales, and was sent to New South Wales on the Countess of Harcourt.

William Weare, a solicitor and a gambler, was killed by John Thurtell, a former Royal Marine officer and an amateur boxer, who owed Weare an immense sum of money. Thurtell had invited Weare for a weekend of gambling with Joseph Hunt and William Probert, but shot Weare just short of their destination. The three men hid the corpse in a pond. After the ensuing trial, Thurtell was hanged, Hunt sentenced to transportation, and Probert, who had turned King's evidence, was given his freedom. On arrival, Hunt was sent to Bathurst, and was granted his ticket of leave in 1832, and a conditional pardon in 1842. He died in Bathurst in 1861, and his occupation was given as District Constable.

The trial was a public sensation and one of the most famous of the nineteenth century. Many accounts were published, ranging from cheap chapbooks right through to more beautifully illustrated editions such as this one.

Ferguson, 956.

Price (AUD): $975.00  other currencies     Ref: #3812957

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