An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…. George BARRINGTON.
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…

An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales…
An Account of a Voyage to New South Wales … [and] The History of New South Wales including Botany Bay, Port Jackson, Parramatta, Sydney and all its Dependancies…

London: Jones, 1810.

Two volumes, octavo; both works completely uncut in original boards, later paper title-labels; handsome matching slipcases.

Matching pair uncut in original boards

A beautiful uncut set of Barrington's famous pair of works, distinctly rare in this well-preserved original condition. The History, with its seventeen full-page plates, is the first book on the new colony to contain coloured illustrations of Sydney; these are also among the earliest engravings to show proper settlement -- only Collins' Account of the Colony (1798) having any earlier depictions. Despite questions about its actual authorship, this is a substantial and important account of early Sydney. The preface claims with some justice that 'no prior attempt has been made to produce a complete history of the Country itself, from its discovery, and an account of its inhabitants, their customs and manners…'.

A beautiful uncut set of Barrington's famous pair of works, distinctly rare in this well-preserved original condition. The History, with its seventeen full-page plates, is the first book on the new colony to contain coloured illustrations of Sydney; these are also among the earliest engravings to show proper settlement -- only Collins' Account of the Colony (1798) having any earlier depictions. Despite questions about its actual authorship, this is a substantial and important account of early Sydney. The preface claims with some justice that 'no prior attempt has been made to produce a complete history of the Country itself, from its discovery, and an account of its inhabitants, their customs and manners…'.
The matching Voyage volume provides considerable detail on eighteenth-century New South Wales not available elsewhere. It too is illustrated, with twelve full-page coloured plates, and a portrait of the notorious "author". Barrington had been transported on the Third Fleet of 1791, already a legend as a rogue, and over the next decade English publishers used his notoriety to produce books on transportation and the new colony for a public eager for information.


1802:
A charming copy of this important "Barrington" title, now famous as the first book to contain a suite of coloured illustrations of Sydney: the views in David Collins' Account, on which they are based, having been published in black and white.
Transported to New South Wales on the Third Fleet of 1791, Barrington was already a legendary hero in England. The English public's continuing interest in New South Wales and the fate of the transported convicts encouraged the publishers' greed: they compiled information from various sources more official sources to make these cheaper and thus more widely read accounts. It is quite reasonable to suggest that the little most people in Great Britain knew about New South Wales derived chiefly from one or another of the Barrington books.
This 1802 publication is easily one of the most important of the scores of different Barrington titles, "an ambitious and elaborate 'new' work, published in tandem with an expanded version of the Voyage. The text was for the most part a plagiaristic rewriting of David Collins' Account of the English Colony in New South Wales. Along with other preliminary materials ventriloquising 'Barrington's' increasingly grandiose aims as a colonial historian, the work included a dedication to the King" (Garvey). The preface claims justifiably that "no prior attempt has been made to produce a complete history of the Country itself, from its discovery, and an account of its inhabitants, their customs and manners…".
Although collation of the work is complex, this copy not only has all of the various preliminaries and prefaces noted by Garvey, it also includes an extra leaf "To our Subscribers" which appears to be quite uncommon, and which advertises "Mr. Barrington's Voyage to New South Wales" in suitably fulsome tones (see following). This copy has the second issue title-page with "Parramatta" corrected.

Attractive copy of the first edition of this important "Barrington" title, now famous as the first book to contain a suite of coloured illustrations of Sydney (the views in David Collins' Account, on which they are mainly based, having been published in black and white). This copy is an example of the first issue of the book with the title-page mistake "Pamaratta" uncorrected.
Transported to New South Wales on the Third Fleet of 1791, Barrington was already a legendary figure in England as a notorious but highly skilled pickpocket. His trial was of huge interest to the public; popular interest in New South Wales and the fate of the transported convicts encouraged the publishers' appetite; they compiled information from various sources, mainly from the expensive First Fleet quartos but also from official reports as well as the popular press, to make these cheaper and thus more widely read accounts. It is quite reasonable to suggest that the little most people in Great Britain knew about New South Wales derived chiefly from one or another of the Barrington books. Certainly even if the entire "Barrington" canon is a concoction from other sources, the 80 entries in Ferguson's bibliography demonstrate the great reach that his accounts had among contemporary readers.
This 1802 publication is one of the most important of the scores of different Barrington titles, "an ambitious and elaborate 'new' work, published in tandem with an expanded version of the Voyage. The text was for the most part a plagiaristic rewriting of David Collins' Account of the English Colony in New South Wales. Along with other preliminary materials ventriloquising 'Barrington's' increasingly grandiose aims as a colonial historian, the work included a dedication to the King" (Garvey). The preface claims justifiably that "no prior attempt has been made to produce a complete history of the Country itself, from its discovery, and an account of its inhabitants, their customs and manners…".
The book was issued by the same publisher and near the same time as the Account of a Voyage to New South Wales, and collectors have often bound the two works to style, as here. This copy has the simple ownership stamp of the bibliographer and collector Sidney Spence.

2 ed Hjstory
Second edition of the Barrington History, the text unchanged from the first edition of 1802 but with a new Preface and a substantial 39-page supplement. 'The supplement, which is not claimed to be Barrington's work, rehashed a number of travel accounts that had appeared in the press in the first decade of the nineteenth century, along with sketches of "Remarkable Persons" in the antipodes, including William Bligh, the "Scottish Martyrs", and one George Bruce, "an Englishman, married to a Princess of New Zealand"…'. (Garvey). The preface's puffing claims of massive public clamour for a new edition is not supported by evidence of sales: Garvey shows that it was still being sold well into the 1820s.
Barrington's History has long been understood to be largely a concoction of material sourced from others published over a name infamous enough to encourage sales. Even as a concoction, however, it did provide much of the picture of the new country available to the reading public in Europe at the start of the 19th century. From our viewpoint today, the text and its series of coloured images offers a sort of easy exoticism mingled with wry and slightly nervous racism: "orientalism" in fact, in the modern definition. Neither Said nor those who have followed him have applied the term to the stereotypical and colonialist portrayal of Australia and its original inhabitants, but the Barrington genre does satisfy that definition. Nonetheless, the plates are charming, including the fine coloured view of Sydney that is used as the frontispiece. Five plates depict Aboriginal activities, and there is a series of ten plates of exotic natural history.

Barrington 705/009
Volume 1 Plates in "Binding direction" are all accounted for.
Condition
A foxing to last few pages. Index only
acidic browning to plates 89 & 145. 145 has a dirty spot
hole23 184 189 191 195 221 224
117 water-stain
129 brown spot
220 brown spot
233-280 browned section
295 tear
289-300 browned section

Volume 2
Plates in "Binding direction" are all accounted for.
Some in slightly wrong position:
• Birds of Paradise facing page 436 not 435
• Horn Bill facing 440 not 439
• Snakes facing 448 not 449
Plate not mentioned – Church of Paramatta 503

Condition
Small closed holes (probably not worth mentioning) on preface, 53/54 55/56 95/96
486 bottom edge dirty
Small tear on page 501
Rear free endpaper hole – larger and noticeable.

Abbey, Travel, 565n & 606n; Ferguson, 486 & 487; Garvey, 'George Barrington', AB47.

Price (AUD): $10,000.00  other currencies     Ref: #3705009

Condition Report