The Description and Use of the Globes, and the Orrery. To which is prefixed, by way of introduction, a brief Account of the Solar System. Joseph HARRIS.
The Description and Use of the Globes, and the Orrery. To which is prefixed, by way of introduction, a brief Account of the Solar System.
The Description and Use of the Globes, and the Orrery. To which is prefixed, by way of introduction, a brief Account of the Solar System.
The Description and Use of the Globes, and the Orrery. To which is prefixed, by way of introduction, a brief Account of the Solar System.

The Description and Use of the Globes, and the Orrery…
The Description and Use of the Globes, and the Orrery. To which is prefixed, by way of introduction, a brief Account of the Solar System.

London: Printed for Thomas Wright, Mathematical Instrument-Maker… And E. Cushee, Globe-Maker, 1738.

Octavo, with six engraved folding plates; early ink ownership inscription ("John Wadham, his booke July 12th 1762"), armorial bookplate of Belsfield, and a later owner's embossed stamp; a good, crisp copy in contemporary dark calf, front cover later paper label.

Globes, by the Master of the Mint

A popular handbook on globes which ran to at least ten editions from 1731 (this is the fourth). Harris begins with an introduction to the latest models of globes, celestial and terrestrial. He then demonstrates how to use the globes to solve forty-six problems, including finding latitudes and longitudes for any given place, finding the position of the sun at any given date, discovering on which date the sun will be directly overhead in any given spot in the torrid zone, computing the length of any given day of the year, finding the altitude of a star, and so on (Taylor, The Mathematical Practitioners).

A popular handbook on globes which ran to at least ten editions from 1731 (this is the fourth). Harris begins with an introduction to the latest models of globes, celestial and terrestrial. He then demonstrates how to use the globes to solve forty-six problems, including finding latitudes and longitudes for any given place, finding the position of the sun at any given date, discovering on which date the sun will be directly overhead in any given spot in the torrid zone, computing the length of any given day of the year, finding the altitude of a star, and so on (Taylor, The Mathematical Practitioners).

Joseph Harris (1702-64) began as a blacksmith in Cornwall with an interest in mathematics. He designed and made mathematical and navigational instruments, and his interest in navigation led him to voyage to Mexico and Jamaica. He also taught mathematics, and in 1748 became Master of the Mint in the Tower of London. These interests are reflected in his publications on coinage and navigation.

The two publishers of the book were also practical savants: Thomas Wright was a maker of scientific instruments, who specialised in the orrery, while Richard Cushee (who died in about 1732: the publisher here is probably his son) was a maker of globes and was the engraver of the plates in this book.

Price (AUD): $2,850.00  other currencies Ref: #3409273

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