Objections to the project of His Excellency Sir George Gipps, for raising a Loan to be secured on the ordinary Revenue of the Colony; submitted by His Excellency to the Legislative Council of New South Wales, 1841. William BLAND.
Objections to the project of His Excellency Sir George Gipps, for raising a Loan to be secured on the ordinary Revenue of the Colony; submitted by His Excellency to the Legislative Council of New South Wales, 1841.
Objections to the project of His Excellency Sir George Gipps, for raising a Loan to be secured on the ordinary Revenue of the Colony; submitted by His Excellency to the Legislative Council of New South Wales, 1841.

Objections to the project of His Excellency Sir George Gipps…
Objections to the project of His Excellency Sir George Gipps, for raising a Loan to be secured on the ordinary Revenue of the Colony; submitted by His Excellency to the Legislative Council of New South Wales, 1841.

Sydney: James Tegg, George Street, 1842.

Octavo, 20 pp.; in plain brown wrappers.

Governor Gipps Under Fire

Scarce attack on Gipps: the final ten pages comprise a protest regarding the New South Wales Legislative Council signed by both John Jamison and John Blaxland. Having unsuccessfully sought English aid in cancelling immigration orders after the expensive rush of bounty immigrants, and after being severely censured for issuing orders in excess of land revenue, Gipps submitted a plan to the Local Legislature 'for raising by Debentures the sum of £200,000, to be secured on, and paid out of the Ordinary Revenue of the Colony, if not satisfied within three years, out of the Land Fund, and bearing interest not exceeding the rate of six per cent. per annum, payable out of the Ordinary Revenue of the Colony…'. This pamphlet sets out the objections to the plan, which was not accepted. Gipps was then forced to draw on the military chest, and when that was exhausted, withdrew government deposits from the banks to meet the deficits already incurred for bounty payments. When all these measures proved inadequate, he finally borrowed £50,000 in debentures, "a daring innovation" (ADB).

Scarce attack on Gipps: the final ten pages comprise a protest regarding the New South Wales Legislative Council signed by both John Jamison and John Blaxland. Having unsuccessfully sought English aid in cancelling immigration orders after the expensive rush of bounty immigrants, and after being severely censured for issuing orders in excess of land revenue, Gipps submitted a plan to the Local Legislature 'for raising by Debentures the sum of £200,000, to be secured on, and paid out of the Ordinary Revenue of the Colony, if not satisfied within three years, out of the Land Fund, and bearing interest not exceeding the rate of six per cent. per annum, payable out of the Ordinary Revenue of the Colony…'. This pamphlet sets out the objections to the plan, which was not accepted. Gipps was then forced to draw on the military chest, and when that was exhausted, withdrew government deposits from the banks to meet the deficits already incurred for bounty payments. When all these measures proved inadequate, he finally borrowed £50,000 in debentures, "a daring innovation" (ADB).

Crittenden, 'James Tegg', p. 73.

Price (AUD): $950.00  other currencies     Ref: #3401038

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