The New South Wales Government Gazette… Vol. 16…. MOFFITT BINDING, NEW SOUTH WALES.
The New South Wales Government Gazette… Vol. 16…
The New South Wales Government Gazette… Vol. 16…
The New South Wales Government Gazette… Vol. 16…
The New South Wales Government Gazette… Vol. 16…

The New South Wales Government Gazette… Vol. 16…
The New South Wales Government Gazette… Vol. 16…

Sydney: W.J. Row, 1st July - 31 December, 1844.

Thick folio; in contemporary half calf with gilt-lettered labels.

A fine collection of the New South Wales Government Gazette for July to December 1844, in an original binding by William Moffitt, a free convict and Sydney's first bookbinder of note. Examples of Moffitt's work are scarce. Although worn, this handsome yet utilitarian binding of half calf with marbled paper boards retains some of the gilt tooling of the spine and the original lettered labels.

A fine collection of the New South Wales Government Gazette for July to December 1844, in an original binding by William Moffitt, a free convict and Sydney's first bookbinder of note. Examples of Moffitt's work are scarce. Although worn, this handsome yet utilitarian binding of half calf with marbled paper boards retains some of the gilt tooling of the spine and the original lettered labels.

William Moffitt was the first skilled Sydney bookbinder, rising from humble beginnings as an assigned convict. In July 1827 Moffitt arrived in New South Wales aboard the Guildford and set up his own shop in 1830. Clearly an entrepreneurial and capable man, Moffitt amassed considerable wealth from land speculation during this turbulent time in the colony's history. He took on several apprentices who later became successful bookbinders in their own right, notably Charles Harwood and George Springate.

Unlike the rapid advent of decorated and lettered cloth case binding in Britain, Australia remained relatively immune to large scale industrialization of book production, with a reliance on older hand-production binding techniques through most of the nineteenth-century. It was not until the 1880s that the larger publishers introduced mechanized case binding. William Moffitt was one such example of a binder reliant upon traditional methods who diversified into the hand binding of stationery items such as logbooks and ledgers. Eventually this aspect of the business eclipsed the binding of printed books, and Moffitt's business was eventually amalgamated into the highly successful stationers and booksellers W. C. Penfold. Early Australian bookbinders often had a reasonable education but written memoirs are scant and binders labels (such as the finely engraved example seen on the endpaper of this volume) provide valuable evidence of their activities and workmanship.

Price (AUD): $950.00  other currencies Ref: #2400739

Condition Report