A series of reports from Sturt's expeditions contained in a volume of NSW Government "Proclamations, Acts in Council, Government Orders, and Notices and Orders" STURT, NSW GOVERNMENT ORDERS.
A series of reports from Sturt's expeditions contained in a volume of NSW Government "Proclamations, Acts in Council, Government Orders, and Notices and Orders"
A series of reports from Sturt's expeditions contained in a volume of NSW Government "Proclamations, Acts in Council, Government Orders, and Notices and Orders"

A series of reports from Sturt's expeditions contained in a volume of NSW Government "Proclamations, Acts in Council, Government Orders, and Notices and Orders"…
A series of reports from Sturt's expeditions contained in a volume of NSW Government "Proclamations, Acts in Council, Government Orders, and Notices and Orders"

Sydney: Ralph Mansfield for the Executors of Robert Howe, 1825-1832.

Folio, original half calf and marbled boards, sides somewhat worn but a very attractive binding by Moffitt with his binder's ticket.

Collection of government orders, bound by Moffitt, including all Sturt's despatches from his first two expeditions

A very good volume of government notices as issued for official purposes, in a Sydney binding by W. Moffitt, which originally belonged to the Wollongong Police department. As well as containing a rich collection of documentation for the period of Sir Ralph Darling's governorship of New South Wales, the collection as assembled happens to include a complete series of the earliest printed accounts of Sturt's highly important first two expeditions into the interior of Southern Australia, extracted from his own reports and journals transmitted from the field.

A very good volume of government notices as issued for official purposes, in a Sydney binding by W. Moffitt, which originally belonged to the Wollongong Police department. As well as containing a rich collection of documentation for the period of Sir Ralph Darling's governorship of New South Wales, the collection as assembled happens to include a complete series of the earliest printed accounts of Sturt's highly important first two expeditions into the interior of Southern Australia, extracted from his own reports and journals transmitted from the field.

This volume comprises the earliest published accounts of these expeditions, printed periodically in the Government Orders and Notices over 1829 and 1830. The importance of Sturt's discoveries was immediately recognised. The news rekindled interest in Australian discovery and geography, which had become subdued in the second half of the 1820s. Sturt returned to England in 1832 in ill-health and wrote an account of his discoveries while undergoing treatment for blindness.

At this time Government Acts, Proclamations, Orders, and Notices were printed periodically, usually with a running pagination (and consequently sometimes with unexpected gaps or errors in the numeration). Volumes such as this represent the accumulation of Orders and Notices received by an individual official, magistrate, or settler which were subsequently bound up without the cumulative title-pages and sectional titles. Accordingly, very few copies comprise identical contents and there is no entirely accurate collation for the annual output from the Government press.

...

Charles Sturt was the first great figure of the heroic age of Australian exploration and his first expedition was the first major exploratory undertaking of Darling's administration and accorded with his policy of extending the limits of European settlement throughout the continent. Sturt left Sydney on 10 November 1828. By the end of December Sturt and Hume had determined the limits of the Macquarie Marshes. Moving north, they discovered a fine river flowing to the west which they named the Darling in February 1829. They traced both the Bogan and the Castlereagh Rivers into the Darling, and traced the Macquarie into the Castlereagh, returning to Sydney in April 1829.

Sturt now sought approval to lead another expedition to trace the Darling River to this inland sea but Darling sent him instead to trace the Murrumbidgee to its presumed outlet on the south coast. Sturt left Sydney at the beginning of November 1829. Rowing along the Murrumbidgee by whaleboat, his party was swept into a broad, strong-flowing river in January 1830. He named this river the Murray, not realising it was the Hume river earlier discovered by Hume and Hovell. One week later Sturt discovered the junction of the Darling and the Murray, thus providing the solution to the mystery of the westward flowing rivers after nearly twenty years of speculation. Continuing down the Murray, he reached Lake Alexandrina and the south coast in February. But his exultation was short-lived: the Murray mouth was not passable to shipping and hopes for an inland waterway were dashed. Worse still, the vessel which Darling had promised to send to meet them was not to be found. He and his men were faced with an arduous return journey, rowing against the current without adequate supplies for nearly a thousand miles.

Sturt's reports are as follows:

First expedition: "Report from Western Marshes, 25 December, 1828" (Government Orders, 23 January, 1829, pp 2C-8C); "Report from Mount Harris, 4 and 5 March 1829" (Government Orders, 6 April, 1829, pp. C11-C17); "Report from Wellington Valley, 16 April, 1829" (Government Orders, 1 May, 1829, pp. 18C-20C).

Second expedition: "Report from Depot on the Murrumbidgee, 4 January, 1830" (Government Orders, 3 March, 1830, pp. 1C-2C); "Report from Banks of the Murrumbidgee, 20 April 1830" (Government Orders, 10 May, 1830, ppC3-10C).

Provenance: Contemporary inscription on front endpaper: "Police Office, Wollongong"; private collection (Sydney).

Price (AUD): $4,200.00  other currencies Ref: #4504591